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KPFA KPFB 

94.1 FM 89.3 FM 

2207 Shattuck Avenue 
Berkeley, California 94704 
Telephone (415) 848-6767 



The KPFA Folio is not sold, it is sent 
free to each subscriber to the station. 
The Folio is published monthly as a 
service to subscribers who support our 
nonprofit, noncommercial station at 
the annual rate of $24.00 (student and 
retired persons annual subscription 
rate $12.00 per year). Subscriptions 
and donations are tax deductible. 
KPFA is in the 30% tax deduction 
category. 

KPFA broadcasts daily until well past 
midnight, beginning on weekdays at 
7:00 AM and on weekends at 8:00 
AM. KPFA broadcasts with a power 
of 59,000 watts at 94.1 MHz. KPFB 
broadcasts simultaneously with KPFA 
at a power of 150 watts at 89.3 MHz 
to areas of Berkeley which do not 
receive KPFA. 

KPFA is owned and operated by 
Pacifica Foundation. Pacifica Founda- 
tion also owns and operates WBAI in 
New York, KPFK in Los Angeles, and 
KPFT in Houston. Pacifica Foundation 
was established in 1946 and is incor- 
porated under the laws of California. 

Copyright (£y 

1970 Pacifica Foundation 

All rights reserved 

The KPFA Folio 
October 1970 
Vol. 1,No. 9 



kppv pOQCJiL 



OCCOBCIL 



CONTENTS 



MANAGER'S REPORT 


2 


RESTAURANT REVIEW 


4 


MUSE AGHAST 


4 


AN INTERVIEW WITH 




GEORGE JACKSON 


6 


OPERA PLOT SUMMARIES 


9 


QUADRAPHONIC !! 


10 


HIGHLIGHTS 


12 


LISTINGS 


14 


COMMENTATORS 


45 


CLASSIFIED ADS 


46 



44 



COVER: The front and back covers are two 
French student revolutionary posters, from a 
series collected and photographed on the site 
by Herschel B. Chipp, Professor of Art 
History, University of California, Berkeley. 




Station Manager 
Al Silbowitz 

Administrative Assistant 
Pat Abramovitz 
Assistant Manager 
Elsa Knight Thompson 
Promotion Director 
Tom Green 

FOLIO Editor 
Laurel Coke 

Supervising Bookkeeper 
Mary Roman 
Bookkeeper 
Marion Jansen 

Subscription Registrar 
Marsha 

Public Affairs Director 
Bill Northwood 
News Directors 
Lincoln Bergman 
Joe Belden 



Drama & Literature Director 
Eleanor Sully 

Associate Drama & Literature 

Director 
Bob Sitton 
Music Director 
Charles Amirkhanian 
Music Assistant 
Warren Van Orden 
Public Affairs Program 

Producer 
Denny Smithson 
Program Secretary 
Roberta Phillips 
Operations Director 
Alan Farley 
Production Assistants 
Bob Bergstresser 
Paul Fagan 
Traffic Clerk 
Janice Legnitto 



Chief Engineer 
George Craig 
Engineers 
Steve Hawes 
Wayne Wagner 

Aides de KPFA 
Carol Amyx 

H e r b C h i I d s , Subscrip tion 
Terry Clarke, D & L 
Bob Douthitt, Computer 
Consultant 
Jim Emdy , Production 
Richard Friedman, Music 
Don Kaufman, Engineering 
Claude Marks, Reporter 
Marion Wylie, Receptionist 
Robin Kirk, Receptionist 






Your KPFA Folio can be re- 
cycled with your newspapers 
by removing the two center 
staples. 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 






REPORT FROM 
the MANAGER 




In case you haven't no- 
ticed, there's a pronoun- 
ced air of uncertainty 
in America these days. 
Many forces are distort- 
ing our social fabric, bal- 
looning it out in some 
places and tearing 
through in others. Some 
are experiencing a sense of drift and indecision, 
others are hearing a clear call to conflict. 
One major drive seems to be a powerful desire 
for identity, pride, and group solidarity. An 
American identity which had held fairly steady 
since the Second World War, is now thoroughly 
and publically shattering. The "melting pot" 
itself seems to be melting from the high heat 
generated by the American experiment. The 
Native American, the Chicano, the Black, the 
student, the elderly, women, and just about 
every other submerged group seems to be bob- 
bing up to the surface, reaching for air and 
sunlight and release. 

Everything is in question. The center doesn't 
seem to be holding. Just in the past three years, 
we have become accustomed to a level of vio- 
lence, anger, and anxiety that was unthinkable 
earlier. Perhaps the periods of the great depres- 
sion and before it the Civil War, were of a similar 
order of magnitude on a social Richter scale. 
Perhaps not. After all, the scope and intensity 
of international involvement were probably less 
then. 

In the midst of all this, we at KPFA reflect 
upon the meaning and purpose of our own very 
special shared experiment in communication 
with you. We have been broadcasting for 21 
years. Of necessity, we have some of the char- 
acter of an "institution," naughty word though 
it is. Yet, we are flexible and fluid as few institu- 
tions are. The world flows through us. We sort 
and cull when we can but, lately, we are increas- 
ingly overwhelmed by the size of our job. It is a 
creative challenge for us and for you as well. 

Our fiscal year ends on September 30. As 
soon as possible thereafter, vve will try to pro- 
vide you with an informative financial report. 
We can then look back at the past year and set 
some important objectives for the next one. 



I'm sure you know by now about KPFA's 
Bus Drive. We need more and better remote 
equipment. More important, you need it. KPFA 
can give you ears that hear important social, 
political, and cultural events throughout north- 
ern California. Let us lend you our ears. Con- 
tribute to the KPFA-BUS fund. 

During this past year, KPFA broadcast live 
Berkeley City Council meetings on the acquisi- 
tion of the police helicopters and revision of 
the Police Department; San Francisco Board of 
Supervisors' meetings concerned with the Trans- 
america tower; the Riles-Rafferty debate from 
San Mateo; many public demonstrations and 
rallies; numerous live music broadcasts. The 
list is very long, but it should be much longer. 

We're very pleased to be asking you for 
funds for a project and not because we're in a 
financial crisis. We know you will like the 
result of this drive, so don't hang back. KPFA, 
Pacifica, is the alternate medium in broad- 
casting. Send a comfortable check to KPFA-BUS 
today along with the coupon on the adjoining 
page. 




Our new Public Affairs Director, Bill Northwood, 
spent his formative years in and around Detroit, 
Michigan, and Washington, D.C. He' attended 
Brown University, graduated with an A.B. in 
History, and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Bill 
was with the Peace Corps in Turkey in 1965- 
66, after which he came to Berkeley to do 
graduate work in American history, and political 
science. He. has travelled selectively in Japan, 
Europe, and the Middle East, written heavy 
academic treatises and light pop culture, and 
worked with Claude Marks and other KPFA'ers 
on "Why Are We Here/Nowhere To Run," a 
multimedia show that appeared at the Phoenix 
Gallery in Berkeley last July. He is a devout 
Bokononist. 



Lend us your ears... 

or use ours 

AS YOU KNOW, the KPFA mobile unit broke down 

on its way to cover a Women's Liberation rally in San Francisco. 

We need it, 

and you need it, 

so you can continue to hear 

important social, political, and cultural events 

covered on KPFA. 



REMEMBER THESE PROGRAMS 
KPFA BROUGHT YOU IN THE PAST? 

MAY 

12 Berkeley City Council meeting 

12 Broadcast from College of Arts and Crafts 

12 S.F. Board of Supervisors meeting 

14 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 

15 Report from "Ho Chi Minh park" 

15 Report from Wurster Hall and Boalt Hall on U.C 

campus 
15 KPFA mobile unit investigates "Wheeler Action 

Committee" 
18 Berkeley Academic Senate meeting 
21 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 

26 Berkeley City Council meeting 

27 Kunstler and Cleaver at Greek Theater on U.C. 
campus 

27 Kunstler speaking at Fillmore West 
31 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 



JUNE 

4 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 
14 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 
18 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 

JULY 

9 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 
16 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 
21 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 

AUGUST 

1 First Annual Bluegrass Revival, Golden Gate Park 

5 Huey Newton press conference 

6 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 

12 Live report from Telegraph Avenue 

13 "Radio Free Alcatraz" 

18 Berkeley City Council meeting (excerpts) 

19 Rally from Civic Center on Soledad Brothers and 
Los Siete 

19 Report from Nourse Auditorium 

25 Berkeley City Council meeting 

26 Women's Liberation Rally - ALMOST! 



In the future...? 

We want to do much more, of course. That depends on you. 

For remote equipment we've set our goal at $10,000. Every dollar counts. Just $1 from 
each KPFA subscriber would do it. If you're already a subscriber, send us what you can 
afford, or give a gift subscription to a friend. If you're not a subscriber yet, become one. 

HERE IS MY CONTRIBUTION TO THE KPFA BUS DRIVE: 

[ ] IT'S JUST A STRAIGHT CONTRIBUTION. GOOD LUCK. 

[ ] I'D LIKE TO JOIN THE 1666 CLUB ($5 a month for a year). HERE'S MY 1st CHECK. 

[ ] I'M NOT A SUBSCRIBER, SO I'LL TAKE A SUBSCRIPTION. 

[ ] APPLY THIS TO A GIFT SUBSCRIPTION TO MY FRIEND. 

ON SUBSCRIPTION OR Gl FT SUBSCRIPTION, PLEASE INDICATE... 

REGULAR SUBSCRIPTION... [ ] 1 year-$24 [ ] 6mos-$12 

Student/Retired/Unemployed... [ ] 1year-$12 [ ] 6 mos-$6 

YOUR NAME 

A DDR ESS . 

CI TY _ZIP . — 



! 



NAME OF GIFT RECIPIENT. 

ADDRESS 

CITY 



ZIP. 



SEND TO: KPFA-BUS, 2207 SHATTUCK AVENUE, BERKELEY CALIF 94704 





RESTAURANT 
REVIEW 

by 

Michael & Carol 
Barclay 

In this month of the opening of the Fall quarter 
at the University of California at Berkeley, the 
Barclays consider several restaurants that will be 
of special interest to returning students. 

YEN CHING 
2017 Shattuck Avenue 
(just off University) 848-2200 
(Hours: Monday — Sunday 
11:00 AM -3:00 PM; 4:30- 10:30 PM 
Closed Tuesday) 

This is our favorite restaurant in Berkeley — the 
best Mandarin and Northern specialities in the 
Bay Area. Owner-hostess Lydia Chyr is wonder- 
fully helpful and friendly. Once you start going 
you will be among the hundreds of regulars who 
dine here weekly. We recommend for a first visit 
some variation of the following menu: Hot and 
Sour Soup, Pot Stickers, Garlic Chicken, 
Mongolian Beef or Oyster Sauce Beef, Twice 
Cooked Pork or Mo Shu Pork and a Yen Ching 
speciality — "Princess Prawns" — a concoction 
of sesame seeds, wine, jumbo fried prawns and 
hot-sweet spices — you will never forget your 
first Princess Prawn! Everything else on the 
enormous menu is excellent so be daring — More 
on Yen Ching in a forthcoming review. Most 
meals run under $2.50 a person. 



MAIKO 

2006 Ninth Street 

Just off University 848-9707 

(Hours: Closed Wednesday 

Daily: From 5:00 PM) 

Excellent Japanese food in a tropical atmosphere, 
i.e. absolutely no ventilation so Maiko should be 
avoided on Berkeley's four warm nights a year. 
Complete menu with huge dinners — three of 
them — or dozens of a la carte items. Dinner B, 
a favorite, consists of clear soup, cabbage salad, 
sunomuno (crab and cucumber vinaigrette), 
prawn and vegetable tempura and sukiyaki. All 
the rice you can consume and two scoops of ice 
cream and sherbet at $3.25. Always crowded by 
6:00 PM and there is usually a ten to fifteen 
minute wait — well worth it! Excellent sushi and 
udoni! 



THE ALBERTINE 
2649 San Pablo Avenue 
(at Derby) 841-8026 
(Hours: Everyday from 
6:00 AM- 10:00 PM) 

Wonderful Southern Black and traditional soul 
food. Complete dinners (large and varied) from 
$1.20. The service is excellent at counter or 
tables. The Albertine has its local regulars and 
many Cal students. Dinners include a rich 
chicken gumbo soup, incredible cornbread, beau- 
tifully prepared greens and yams, black eyed 
peas, portion of meat or fowl and fabulous 
peach cobbler. The entrees are pretty standard 
American ideas but the trimmings and the 
atmosphere are strictly soul. A real bargain in a 
town with few! 

We hope you'll try our first reccomendations 
and write to us with suggestions — future months 
will review four pick restaurants and feature a 
selected recipe. We hope to cover the entire 
KPFA listening area starting in Berkeley and San 
Francisco. On To Good Eating! 

Restaurant Review with Michael and Carol 
Barclay is Heard every Wednesday at 5:00 PM 
on KPFA. 



MUSE AGHAST 



By Charles Amirkhanian 

Calling to your attention a selection of new and 
not-so-new commercially-available records. 

THE MUSIC OF KOMITAS 






This album was issued to commemorate 
the 100th anniversary of the birth of the 
Armenian composer and musicologist Soghomon 
Soghmonian, born September 22, 1869. 

Soghomonian was to become a monk in the 
Armenian orthodox church and assumed the 
clerical name Komitas Vartabed (comparable to 
Dr. Komitas) for the remainder of his life. Fol- 
lowing intensive music study in Berlin (he re- 
ceived a Ph. D. in Musicology in 1899) Komitas 
devoted the next fifteen years of his life to the 
KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



study of folk music of his own people. In short 
Komitas was to Armenia as Bela Bartok was to 
Hungary. He carefully transcribed music of in- 
numerable Armenian villages, always striving to 
collate only pure Armenian music (much of it 
centuries old), to the exclusion of Arabic, Kur- 
dish, Turkish and Western influences which also 
were present. From 1899 to 1915, Komitas was 
renowned in Europe as the foremost authority 
on Armenian traditional music, lecturing ex- 
tensively in Berlin, Paris, and other centers. All 
the while, he underwent severe criticism from 
church authorities who disliked Komitas' en- 
thusiastic pursuit of secular music studies as well 
as the latter's habit of performing sacred music 
in concert halls outside of the church. In April 
1915, Komitas was one of numerous Armenian 
intellectuals abused and deported from Con- 
stantinople (where he had organized a 300- 
voice chorus). During this time he witnessed the 
brutal massacre of hoards of his people, emerg- 
ing physically frail and mentally ill. Following 
his release he was sent to Paris in 1919 for treat- 
ment, but he never regained his former health, 
and died finally on October 22, 1935. 

His legacy included the choral music and 
works for piano solo heard on this two-record 
album issued by the Komitas Centennial Com- 
mittee. All of the music is written in the original 
modes so that many of the pieces have key sig- 
natures not normally found in Western classical 
music. The performers on the album include an 
amazing all-star cast of Armenian-Americans 
including pianists Maro Ajemian and Sahan 
Arzuni, sopranos Lucine Amara and Cathy 
Berberian, contralto Lili Chookasian, tenor 
Vahan Khanzadian, and basses Ara Berberian 
and Michael Kermoyan. Furthermore, The 
Camerata Singers of New York are conducted in 
the many choral works by composer Alan 
Hovhaness. 

The result is a collection of the finest possible 
performances of the very unusual and beautiful 
work of a composer virtually unknown to most 
of us. The album of two discs (including an in- 
ordinately copious eight-page booklet with 
illustrations) is available only through one 
source: Komitas Centennial Committee, Post 
Office Box 264 , Hempstead, New York. 
The price is $12.50, postage paid. 



The 1970 San Francisco Opera Repertoire 
On Records 



TOSCA, Puccini 

1) Callas, Di Stefano, Gobbi-De Sabata 
(Angel 3508 — mono only) 

2) Callas, Bergonzi, Gobbi-Pretre (Angel S-3655) 

3) Nilsson, Corelli, Fischer-Dieskau-Maazel 
(London 1267) 

FALSTAFF, Verdi 

1) Gobbi, Schwarzkopf, Panerai, Moffo, 
Barbieri, Merriman-Von Karajan 
(Angel S-3552) 

SIEGFRIED, Wagner 

1 ) Windgassen, Hotter, Stolze, Neidlinger, 
Hoeffgen, Boehme, Nilsson - Solti 
(London 1508) 

CARMEN, Bizet 

1) Callas, Gedda, Massard, Guiot-Pretre 
(Angel S-3650) 

2) De Los Angeles, Gedda, Blanc, Micheau 
Beecham (Angel S-3613) 

NABUCCO, Verdi 

DSuliotis, Gobbi, Prevedi, Cava-Gardelli 
(London 1382) 

COSI FAN TUTTE, Mozart 

1) Schwarzkopf, Merriman, Otto, Simoneau, 
Panerai, Bruscantini - Von Karajan 
World Record Club OC 195/6/7 

2) Schwarzkopf, Ludwig, Kraus.Taddei - Boehm 
(Angel S-3631) 

3) Seefried, Merriman, Prey, Haefliger, Fischer- 
Dieskau : Jochum (DGG 138861/3) 

SALOME, Richard Strauss 

1) Nilsson, Stolze, Waechter, Kmennt, Hoffman 
Solti (London 1218) 

2) Goltz, Patzak, Braun, Dermota - Clems 
Krauss (Richmond 62007) 

TRISTAN UND ISOLDE, Wagner 

1 ) Windgassen, Nilsson, Waechter, Taleval, 
Ludwig - Boehm (DGG 139221/5) 

2) Flagstead.Suthaus, Greindl, Fischer-Dieskau, 
Thebom - Furtwaengler (Angel 3588 - mono) 

OTELLO, Verdi 

1 ) Vinay, Valdengo, Nelli - Toscanini 
(RCA LM 6107 - mono only) 

2) McCracken, Fischer-Dieskay, Jones 
Barbirolli (Angel S-3742) 

3) Del Monaco, Protti, Tebaldi - Von Karajan 
(London 1324) 



Selected by Michael Barclay, host of KPFA's 

The Superart 

In response to many requests, I have chosen the 
following recordings of the eleven operas in this 
year's repertoire as excellent versions of the 
works. Listening to them would be excellent 
preparation for attending a performance. I have 
suggested more than one set where appropriate. 
KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



FAUST, Gounod 

1) De Los Angeles, Gedda, Christoff - Cluytens 
(Angel S-3622) 

THE RAKE'S PROGRESS, Stravinsky 

1 ) Raskin, Young, Reardon, Sarfaty - Stravinsky 
(Columbia M3S-710) 




ON AUGUST 17TH, DAVID STEVENS 
OF KPFK, LOS ANGELES, TALKED 
WITH GEORGE JACKSON, ONE OF 
THE THREE SOLEDAD BROTHERS, 
INSIDE SAN QUENTIN. 



An Interv 

with 
George 

Jackson 




Q. How did you first get involved with the court 
system? What happened for your first crimes? 

A. It goes back to — well, the first day, the very 
first day I was in California. I wrecked my 
father's car. And the people, the beautiful 
people that were involved in the wreck, they 
didn't call the police. We was just settling it 
among ourselves. But it just so happened that 
a pig came by and saw the accident and inter-; 
vened . . . took my name and address, where 
I was staying; well, it started right there. A 
month later ... I was forced into a juvenile 
court situation — they subpoenaed me and 
my folks, and we had to make expiations, al- 
though the matter had already been settled, 
the accident had already been settled between 
us black folks. The system, the establishment 
had to intervene, and I got a record 
right there. 

Q. How old were you then? 

A. Fifteen. Fourteen . . . fourteen, I was four- 
teen. The first day I came out here! And I 
think that since that time I haven't been on 
the street at one stretch for more than about 
nine months. 

Q. Well, what about the crime that got you into 
Soledad? What was that about? 

A. Simple. Robbery. We were both — me and a 
comerade — we were both pretty, well, con- 
fused. We'd been vacationing down in Mexico 
and we'd just come back, and we were both 
still rather, you know, intoxicated . . . young- 
sters. I was 18 then and ... we did some- 
thing stupid. We drove in a place and took 
the folks' money . . . with my car and every- 
thing. We were both drunk and ... It wasn't 
anything to get excited about ... no one was 
hurt. And, all the money, you know, I gave 
the money back and plus some. I didn't gve 
it back — they took it from me, though, the 
pigs did, when they arrested me. They caught 
me drunk somewhere. They took the money 
I had on me which was twice the amount 
taken from the robbery. Robbery is just an 
expression of — a subconscious expression of 
a disregard for, you know, the establishment. 
I was a kid then. 

Q. Your mother hired a lawyer to help you out 
on the case. 



(Left to right: John Cluchette, George Jackson, 
Fleeta Drum go.) 

KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 






A. Yes. And he was supposed to explain the 
situation that I just ran down to you, and try 
to get us off. In fact, we gave him enough 
to make a deal. That's what he said, you 
know, he was making a deal for us, with the 
D.A. The deal was for both of us to confess 
to a second degree robbery. Simulated rob- 
bery, since they never found a gun. And me 
in particular . . . the people couldn't identify 
me, because I don't believe that I took too 
much part in the actual thing, although I 
don't remember a whole lot about it. But 
we made — he told us that he had made a 
deal with the D.A., and that they didn't take 
things like that too serious, since no one was 
hurt and that, because we cooperated and 
didn't send the court to the expense of trying 
us, that we'd be given county time. You 
know? 

Q. And you've been in for some ten years? 

A. Well, what happened was, we didn't get the 
county time. We went up for sentencing and 
they gave us what the law prescribed in the 
state penitentiary. I've been in prison ever 
since. 

The first prerequisite when you're in a joint 
is, to confess. The Board demands that, the 
Board requires that before you're ever con- 
sidered for a parole, or anything like that, 
you're supposed to admit your guilt. That's 
supposed to be the first step towards being 
broken, what they call rehabilitation. So, 
'most everybody doesn't, you know, who's 
not fighting cases, who's not appealing, will 
make some kind of little — token confession. 
You know, that seems to be the first sign of, 
well, the first sign of submission, really. And 
at the time, I was thinking, you know, I had 
one to life, I was thinking about doing a year, 
maybe fifteen to eighteen months and going 
out. But the shocks and strains of prison life 
and especially the first joint I was committed 
to, Soledad there, the shocks and strains of 
prison life showed me right away that, well, I 
was convinced when I got to Soledad that I 
would probably do more than eighteen 
months. 

Q. What about the person who was the accom- 
plice in this act? 

A. Oh, he's a beautiful brother, I love him. And 
he's out on the street now, and I think he's 
doing well. He's a beautiful brother. He's 
taking part in the liberation struggle, and I 
hope to see him one day. Maybe we can work 
together again . . . with our heads staight . . . 
next time. 

Q. Prison has almost been an education for 
you . . . 

A. Uh huh. I've read . . . well, the first four 
years I read in economics, pure economics. 
The second four years I read in, exclusively 
in, military things, you know, guerrilla war- 
fare, Mao Tse-Tung, Pomeroy, I read Nkru- 



mah's stuff. I read Jacuqes Paul Nguyen 
Jacques, People's Army, People's War. I went 
through the whole gambit, the whole thing, 
the whole line, and I surmise that if I'd stayed 
on the street, I'd probably be dead now, 
humping the ground, a dope fiend, or some- 
thing like that. No, prison was, like you say, 
an educational thing for me. The open, overt 
racism, I mean, just outward, undisguised, 
oppressist . . . 

Q. What year did you get to Soledad, when did 
you start noticing the racism at Soledad? 

A. 1961. Perhaps a month or so before I got 
there, a brother had just gotten killed . . . 

Q. Another brother? 

A. Another brother had gotten killed ... he was 
rat pack. The way those things were, build- 
ings at Soledad at that time was, you'd have 
one hall, and then there was the wings, the 
housing units branch off the hall. And the 
gym, and every other facility in the prison - 
the hospital, the . . . library, they all branch 
off this one long hallway, so in other words, 
you can live your whole life there in the joint 
and never go outside or never have to go out- 
side. Indeed, you never get outside of the 
building. You're traversing this long hall, up 
and down, back and forth; they can lock the 
doors, lock the gates there, and contain all 
movement. Alright, that being the case, when- 
ever we move from wing to wing, or from 
wing to gym, or from wing to the mess hall, 
the police have almost complete control. 
They can stop you in the hall - the hall's not 
more than about 12, 13, 14 feet wide - they 
can stop you in the hall and they can shake 
you down there. And they'll pull you off and 
take you into some little cubicle, you know, 
the cubicles they have off the hall, and give 
you the third degree, shakedown, anything 
they want. 

Q. Will you explain to us exactly what is Soledad 
about. You said it was racist . . . what do you 
mean it was racist? 

A. All prisons, all prisons, I mean all prisons in 
facist America are built on one premise, and 
that is to break the individual, to accustom 
an individual, to acclimate an individual's 
mind to the acceptance of restraints so that, 
when he gets finally broken, finally released, 
he'll be able to live under the restraints placed 
on him by a facist society. 

Q. How do they go about breaking a prisoner 
there? 

A. Well, it's not just Soledad, although Soledad 
could be considered the worst spot right now. 
All prisons use terror; there's no other way to 
hold an individual. Well, let's put it this way: 
there's no way for a small knot of armed 
men to hold a huge crowd of armed men — 
there's no other way besides terror, fear, you 
know, threats, terrorism, brutality. The whole 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



thing is just based on fear. 
Q. How much time did you spend in O Wing at 
Soledad — maximum security. 

A. You know, the greatest portion of my prison 
time was spent right here in San Quentin. See, 
when I got the beef, the first beef in 1962, 
they sent me away from Soledad. I was sent 
here to San Quentin and I did seven straight 
years here, see. And so the time I spent in 
Wing would be limited to the time that I 
spent after I got, I was charged with the al- 
leged murder of the pig down there in 
Soledad. That was from Hanuary of 1970 to 
June — I was transferred back to San Quentin. 
Do you understand that? Do you follow that? 
I was first committed, you know, and then 
every . . . when everyone is first committed, 
they go through guidance centers, either 
Vacaville or Chino. I went to Chino because 
I was committed from Southern California. 
From there you're committed to a certain 
prison. One of the main three - Soledad, 
Folsom or San Quentin. Or perhaps, in cases 
where they figure a guy's already broken, 
pretty well broken, well, they'll send him to 
an honor joint, or a medium or minimum se- 
curity joint. But I was sent to Soledad, 
becuase I was young — I was 18, like I said; 
I think I turned 19 in county jail — so they 
sent me to Soledad, a place for young . . . 
incorrigibles, they call us. And from Soledad, 
I was sent to San Quentin as a result of a dis- 
ciplinary infraction — as a result of an alter- 
cation in 1962, Well, from 1962 to 1969, I 
was in San Quentin, see. All right, as a result 
of an altercation in San Quentin, I was re- 
turned to Soledad. 

Q. What was that altercation? 

A. Which one? You mean the San Quentin one? 
The 1967 riot. If you read the San Francisco 
paper, or any paper in California, you prob- 
ably read about it. Well, I was tied . . . they 
tied me into that. I did two years in the Ad- 
justment Center, you know, from '67 to '69. 
In '69, they transferred me back to Soledad. 

Q. Talking about Jonathan Jackson, your bro- 
ther . . . (interrupts) beautiful brother . . . 
what are your feelings about that? 

A. I feel proud. I haven't shed a tear, if that's 
what you're talking about. I feel proud of 
him. Right from the beginning, right from the 
very beginning, when we started discussing 
military things years ago, I conceded the 
possibility of his death, just as I concede the 
possibility of my own. It's very likely, very 
likely, that we'll all of us going to be a lot of 
funerals, a lot of funerals. That was just the 
first of that particular kind of funeral. There 
gonna be a lot more. And the other thing that 
I'd like to comment on here. A white re- 
porter asked me the other day if / thought 
Jonathan was suicidal, and if /thought blacks 

8 



who attack or who make attacks on the estab- 
lished protective agencies ... I was asked 
whether or not these blacks were suicidal. In 
my opinion was it a self-destructive, frustrated 
strikinq-out at the oppressor. I reminded that 
reporter, and I'd like to also remind anyone 
listening here that there have been funerals 
on both sides, you dig? And if that question 
applies to us, I mean, if anyone could ask us 
that question, they could also accuse the 
man who goes down to the police station and 
signs up to be a pig . . . they could ask him 
the same question, is he suicidal? I don't 
think it's fair to Jonathan Jackson; I don't 
think it's fair to William Christmas or to 
James McClain or to Brother McGee. I don't 
think it's fair at all, to try to bury those bro- 
thers' examples. Brother McGee survived and 
I don't think he'll appreciate it at all. 
The black press, I'm talking about, and of 
course, we don't expe^* much from the media 
. . . from the media a| u ^e, the media from 
outside, the enemy culture, we don't expect 
much from them. But the black. tabloids and 
the underground press — we don't want these 
brothers' examples buried with them. Efforts 
to diminish the Marin Battle, or call it an act 
of desperation or frustration ... I don't be- 
lieve that's the proper way to look at it. I 
believe we're reading the wrong signals from 
the incident. There wasn't one thing that . . . 
could stop those brothers from attaining what 
they started out to do, and that was to kill a 
judge. I think it was well thought out. The 
mistake was in underestimating the vicious- 
nessof the prison guards. If you'll notice, the 
regular county officers surrendered their 
arms, and there wasn't any violence until the 
brothers, until the camerades ran into oppo- 
sition from the prison officials, and that's 
where they made their mistake. The prison 
officials opened fire in complete disregard for 
the lives of five civilians, five non-combat- 
tants: one of them a judge and one of them a 
district attorney. The judges, from the estab- 
lishment, I think they're reading the wrong 
signals from the incident also. As far as I'm 
concerned, what they should try to pick up 
from that incident over there is that they've 
created a force, so termed, so thought of, a 
protective force, that's really capable of 
turning on them. The act of firing into that 
truck in complete disregard of lives, of five 
non-combattants, one of them a superior 
court judge, that's really frightening! The 
first shots were fired by the establishment's 
watchdogs. And to me it seems it's . . . the 
proper signals, the thing to become alarmed 
over, is the fact that the establishment's 
created a force, and given guns to, to ani- 
mals that don't seem to have any restraints 
at all.**** 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



Opera Plot Summaries 



DAS LIEBESVERBOT 
by Richard Wagner 

October 11, 1970 2:00 PM 



The King of Sicily, on a state visit to Naples, 
has left as his regent the puritanical German, 
Friederich, with autnority to reform the man- 
ners and morals of the populace as he sees fit. 
As the opera opens, his agents are closing a num- 
ber of houses of amusement, to the outrage of 
the populace. A young nobleman, Luzio, emerges 
as leader of the people. He has learned that his 
friend Claudio has been condemned to death for 
an indiscretion with the lady to whom he is sec- 
retly betrothed. 

In scene two, Luzio seeks out Claudio's sis- 
ter Isabella, who has just entered a convent, to 
plead with the tyrant for Claudio's life. Isabella's 
acquaintance in the convent, Marianne, confesses 
to her that she had once been betrayed by Frieder- 
ich. Luzio arrives at this moment and hardly needs 
to convince Isabella to confront Friederich. 

Scene three opens with the Chief Constable, 
Brighella, trying various moral offenders. Fried- 
erich shortly arrives, as does Isabella, to whom he 
grants a private audience. Her eloquent plea for 
mercy only stirs his lust, and he strikes the classic 
operatic bargain— mercy for the accused in return 
for a night of love. 

As Act Two begins, Isabella tells her brother 
of the bargain. At first shocked and resolute, 
Claudio finally begs his sister to fulfill it. She has 
him returned to his cell, confessing to herself that 
it will be Marianne, not she, who stays the night 
with Friederich. Luzio is also misled by her appar- 
ent bargaining of her virtue, and on the night of 
the supposed assignation goads the street crowds 
into a Carnival frenzy. At the last moment, as 
Friederich goes off with the supposed Isabella, Isa- 
bella herself discovers that Friederich has signed a 
warrant condemning himself to death for the same 
crime as Claudio's. Luzio, still under the impres- 
sion that Isabella has bartered her virtue, calls the 
crowd to revolution. Suddenly a cry is heard. 
Brighella has accidentally unmasked Friederich and 
Marianne. Friederich begs to be led before the re- 
turning King to receive a capital sentence. Claud- 
io, released from prison by the mob, decries the 
whole idea of penalizing a love-offense. As the 
king's reentry is announced, the crowd goes in pro- 
cession to meet him, bearing the two couples, 
Friederich and Marianne, Luzio and Isabella, be- 
fore them. 



KING ROGER 

by Karol Szymanowski 

October 19, 3:00 PM 

The scene is laid in Sicily, in the Xllth century. 

ACT I. In the Cathedral of Palermo a solemn 
mass is being said. The priests ask King Roger II 
to put a stop to the diffusion of rumours and 
myths injuring the holy Christian Faith. They have 
been told that a stranger who calls himself the 
Shepherd preaches the faith in a new god. The 
King orders to seize the Shepherd but his beloved 
wife Roxana begs him to hear him out and decide 
himself whether he is guilty. 

The Shepherd arrives. He praises his god who 
is young, beautiful and full of life. His words im- 
press the audiences and especially Roxana seems 
to yield to his mysterious charm. In spite of the 
priests' protest the King decides to listen to the 
Shepherd's credo; he sets him free and asks him to 
call on him in the evening. 

ACT II. At night— fall. King Roger is awaiting 
his mysterious guest. The latter appears with a 
suite of his followers. Having greeted the King "in 
the name of eternal love" he tells him his story: he 
has left the shores of the holy river Ganges in In- 
dia and his god had bestowed upon him a miracu- 
lous power. The King is much troubled by this im- 
pious speech, but the sweet voice of Roxana reas- 
sures him again. To the rhythm of a strange music 
the members of the Shepherd's suite begin a rock- 
ing dance. Roxana stands up and subdued by the 
magnetic look of the young- man moves slowly to- 
wards him like a sleepwalker. King Roger sum- 
mons his guards and orders them to seize the Shep- 
herd but the latter shakes off his fetters and retires 
with his suite followed by the King's bewitched 
courtiers and Roxana. 

ACT III. Among the ruins of a Greek theatre 
appears King Roger. He is accompanied by the 
Arabian sage Edrisi. He looks for the mysterious 
Shepherd who had cast the spell on his whole court 
and on Roxana whom he had abducted. Soon the 
Shepherd arrives with his train and the King takes 
part in a sacrifice offered to his pagan god before 
an ancient altar. At sun-rise, the Shepherd turns 
into the Greek god Dionysus and the members of 
his train — into becchantes and maenads. They all 
begin to whirl in an ecstatic and gay dance with 
Roxana joining them. Finally, they retire leaving 
Roger alone. The King feels lonely but having re- 
sisted an uncommon temptation he has reached the 
size of a full man. His magnificent hymn to the ris- 
ing sun is the final solution of all the problems and 
conflicts. 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1970 
7:30- 11:00 PM 



QUADRA 



We begin with Gerhard Samuel conducting 
the Oakland Symphony Orchestra in the 
January 1970 concert of works by Rossini 
(Barber of Seville Overture), David Sheinfeld 
(Confrontation for Orchestra with Electric 
Guitar and Electric Violin - World Premiere 
Performance), Richard Strauss (Also Sprach 
Zarathrustra), and Stravinsky (Jeu de Cartes - 
Cardgame Ballet). 



r 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 



Also on this program, KPFA will introduce I 
three world premiere compositions by West . 
Coast composers. Richard Friedman's work ■ 



titled Serenade is described by the composer 
as a piece "for viola on tape." The piece was 
created for four-channel broadcast in the 
KPFA studios. 




A*** W*Juv*oHt 



In addition, the work of a new coalition of 
composers living in the Bay Area will be 
presented. The group is called "Open," and 
includes John Dinwiddie, Jan Pusina, Don 
Walker, Harrie Walker, and Will Johnson. The 
group works improvisationally in a live- 
electronic music context and we will hear 
two works from their repertoire: (1) 
Aurora Borealis, by Jan Pusina. See score of 
work and photo of performance 



> 



AURORA BOREALIS 

Pour performers play stemware 
on a horizontal glass surface 
which is amplified in four ch 
annels by attaching four cont 
act microphones to the surfac 
e. There is water in the ste 
mware. The performers begin 
and end in unison. jAN pUSINA 



10 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



PHONIC ! ! 



(2) Also, John Dinwiddie's Little Pictures 
With Big Ears. This extraordinary work will 
be performed by the KPFA staff from the 
score below. 



■ft- L— •»- ^ wtJ ^y- J* V 



TU. "p v 



• ivji» ■—■ L—^ ^ 









- - -tU 






• P 1 -!- 



QULbU 

rkONic 



J. v.- r| *i. 



iiiiii iicrum win Hi HU 



JOHN DIHWIODIl '10 



And, finally, to round out the evening, we 
will play a four-channel recording of Touch, 
by Morton Subotnick. This work was given 
its world premiere on the first KPFA quadra- 
phonic broadcast last winter and is heard 
again by popular demand. Since its first 
playing on KPFA, the work was released as a 
stereo album by Columbia Records (Colum- 
bia MS 7316). This is an extraordinary work 
which always blows a few minds every time 
it's played. 



Once again, we remind you: In order to hear 
these transmissions in four-channel sound, 
tune one stereo radio to KPFA (94) and the 
other to KQED-FM (88.5). Place the four 
speakers in the four corners of your listening 
room. The "front" speakers are those tuned 
to KPFA. .,.,/.. 

KPFA and KQED-FM wish to thank two 
firms for paying for the cost of the telephone 
lines for this broadcast: Roger Coggburn 
Wine Company (1569 Solano Avenue, 
Berkeley,) and Nordica Furnishings (1228 
Grant Avenue at Columbus, San Francisco). 



'T^^ SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1970 
7:30- 11:00 PM HALLOWEEN 



Another rousing concert by the Oakland 
Symphony Orchestra under Maestro Gerhard 
Samuel. This time we take you back to 
May 1970 for performances of Rameau's 
Hippolyte et Aricie (excerpts), and of 
Penderecki's Dies Irae for Orchestra, Chorus, 
Soprano, Tenor and Bass. The latter is heard 
in its West Coast premiere performance with 
Marian Marsh, soprano; Howard Fried, tenor; 
Marvin Klebe, bass-baritone, and the Oakland 
Symphony Chorus (Joseph Liebling, Direc- 
tor). A stunning program recorded by George 
Craig in flabbergasting quadraphonic sound. 







Also on this broadcast, we present a quadra- 
phonic tape of a performance of a piece by 
John Cage titled 33 1/3. This was made by 
KPFA aide Roy Chen at the world premiere 
performance of this piece at Davis, California, 
November 21, 1970. The piece involved 
numerous record players placed in a circular 
formation in a large auditorium. Records 
were then played by members of the 
audience. 



a 



Furthermore, we will present a new quadra- 
phonic piece by KPFA Music Director 
Charles Amirkhanian. The work is a word- 
tape piece titled El Autoro de la Jaro (The 
Author of the Year). It is based on the 
sounds of the composer, Lou Harrison, 
speaking a 13-page Esperanto text by 
Amirkhanian. 



e 



Also, we will have another piece by Richard 
Friedman. It is an electronic composition, as 
yet untitled, in the composer's electro- 
magnetic— neurophysical series. 



e 



Hopefully, we will also present the ritual 
improvisations of Nick Ivosis (baritone horn 
and trombone) and Bill Simmons (cymbals, 
gongs, bells and tympani). And many further 
attractions unknown to us at this writing. 



PFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



11 



HIGHLIGHTS* HIGHLIGHTS 



PUBLIC AFM1B5 



The most timely portions of our public affairs 
programming cannot be scheduled and featured 
in advance, but this October we can anticipate 
that a good deal of our time and attention will 
be devoted to what happens on the campuses 
and in the election campaign, as well as to the 
relations between them. Members of our News 
and Public Affairs departments are preparing 
themselves for all possibilities (as should be 
evident from the picture on the inside front 
cover of the Folio), in order to present compre- 
hensive reports on the reconstitution or the 
return to business-as-usual of universities in 
California and throughout the United States. 
We also expect to prepare special reports on a 
number of campaigns for state and federal office 
and to offer extended coverage of races of con- 
siderable local interest. Much of this programming 
will doubtless come weeknights at 8:00 PM on 
Open Hour, which we shall again be scheduling 
for rebroadcast the following afternoon at 1 :45. 
Because Wednesday nights are set aside for our 
inter-departmental Open Evening, thsre will be 
no Open Hour rebroadcast on Thursday after- 
noons; instead, on the five Thursdays in October 
we are presenting a special series of programs 
from the KPFA Archives on the life and in- 
fluence of Malcolm X. This series begins on 
October 1st at 1 :45 PM with the famous speech 
"The Ballot or the Bullet," and includes another 
speech, "The Prospects for Peace," a recording 
of a "Memorial for Malcolm X" that was held in 
New York, and a panel discussion on the achieve- 
ments of the man and his impact on the black 
liberation movement. The series is to conclude 
with the documentary produced by Chris Koch, 
"Malcolm X — A Retrospective," which will be 
heard October 29th at 1:45 PM. We expect to 
continue scheduling special series programs on 
Thursday afternoons in November. 

We are also featuring two other series, both of 
which will be heard on weekends in October. On 
Saturdays at 11:00 PM, we are rebroadcasting 
four programs produced by David Stevens of 
KPFK on the case of The Soledad Brothers. (A 
program of related interest, The Funeral of 
Jonathan Jackson and William Christmas, ^will 
be heard Tuesday, October 20th at 10:30 PM). 
Sundays at 9:00 PM on the Sunday Night Docu- 
mentary we are offering a variety of programs: 
or\ October 4th Dan McClosky's award-winning 
B.B. King documentary; on October 11th, 
Soledad Earphones, a program produced by 
Denny Smithson using material he recorded in- 
side the State Correctional Facility at Soledad; 



on October 18th, the first of three hour-long 
conversations between Ralph J. Gleason and 
Studs Terkel (the second and third of which will 
be heard on Sundays in November); and on 
October 25th, Like Rolling Stones: Young 
People in Berkeley, Summer 1970, a program 
produced by Bill Northwood and Claude Marks 
with a little help from their friends. 

Also worth of note . . . 

Dick Gregory, a speech recorded last June in 

San Francisco 

October 2 at 11:00 PM 
Underground: Interview with, and Poetry by, 

the Rev. Daniel Berrigan, S.J. 

October 22 at 1 1 :00 PM 
In the Name of Peace, a speech given on 

Hiroshima Day by Dr. Kurt Steiner, who 

served as a prosecutor in the Tokyo War 

Crimes Trials 

October 27 at 10:30 PM 

And some longer programs . . . 

Open Forum on the Soviet Union 

October 13 at 10:30 PM 
Debate Between William Kuntsler and RichardG. 
Schultz 

October 21 at 10:30 PM 
U.N.: Controlling Conflicts in the 70's, 
scheduled to commemorate the 25th anni- 
versary of the United Nations on 
October 24 at 7:30 PM 



The 



Ki^is inra^naa^MHiaa 



ONSTAGE 



Five Modern French Plays 

Friday evenings at 9:00 PM 

"Les Fausses Confidences" 

by de Marviaux (in French) 
October 2nd 

"The Balcony" 

by Jean Genet 
October 9th 

"No Exit" 

by Jean-Paul Sartre 
October 16th 

"The Knights of the Round Table" 
by Jean Cocteau (in French) 
October 23rd 

"To End God's Judgment" 
by Antonin Artaud 

October 30th 



HIGHLIGHTS*HIGHLIGHTS 



A SERIES OIM BLACK THEATRE 



Thursday, October 1 


12:45 PM 


Tuesday, October 6 


12:45 PM 


Thursday, October 8 


12:45 PM 


Tuesday, October 13 


12:45 PM 


ON FILM 




Barbara Wolf on Japanese Film 


Furin Kazan (Unde 


r the Banners of Samurai) 


October 3, 1 1 : 1 5 AM 


Kwaidan 




October 10, 11: 


15 AM 


On Kurosawa 




October 17, 11: 


15 AM 



Feinstein in Locarno: Boro Draskovic 

October 17,7:30PM 

ON LITERATURE 

Testament For My Students 

Kay Boyle talks with Eleanor Sully 
October 4,8:15 PM 

On Writers and Writing 

David Gitin introduces the poetry of 
Larry Eigner. 

October 19, 10:00 PM 

The Crack Up, by Scott Fitzgerald 

Adapted from the book of the same name 
and read by Peter Savage of the Berkeley 
Repertory Theatre. 
October 24, 10:15PM 



3 



*OTg>M 



'QUADRAPHONIC BROADCAST Oakland 
Symphony Orchestra concert; new four-channel 
works of John Dinwiddie, Jan Pusina, OPEN, 
Richard Friedman. Tune one stereo radio to 
KPFA (94) and the other to KQED-FM (88.5). 
See details on page 10. 



6 



CONCERT OF INDIAN MUSIC - LIVE 
FROM OUR STUDIOS. Featuring students and 
staff of Ali Akbar College. We hear a solo tabla 
performance by Shankar Ghosh, followed by 
the extraordinary playing of flutist G.S. Schadev, 
recently arrived from India. STEREO. 



10 



GOLGOTHA - OPERA BY FRANK 
MARTIN. Courtesy of the Broadcasting Founda- 
tion of America, we present a performance of 
this striking work by the Swiss composer. 



22 



CONCERT OF INDIAN MUSIC - LIVE 
FROM OUR STUDIOS. Featuring students and 
staff of Ali Akbar College, in a concert of duets. 
First we hear Ali Akbar Khan (sarod) and Indra- 
nil Bhattacharya (sitar) performing with Shankar 
Ghosh (tabla). Then two vocalists, Shrimati San- 
jukta Ghosh and Shrimate Shikha Battacharya, 
combine forces, to the accompaniment of 
Shankar Ghosh. 



24 



SOUND POEMS OF TOBY LURIE. We 

rebroadcast this program of works by the Santa 
Barbara poet. Lurie will be in the Bay Area for 
live performances on October 27 (Mills College), 
October 29 (Canada College), and October 30 
(San Jose State). 



26 



WORLD EAR PROJECT: TRANSMISSION 
THREE. In this third broadcast, we will be 
playing tapes of environmental sounds recorded 
by our listeners and friends from all over the 
world. WORLD EAR is an international co- 
operative sound sensitivity information project. 
Send your recordings of unaltered environ- 
mental sounds recorded ANYWHERE IN THE 
WORLD to KPFA, W.E.P., 2207 Shattuck Ave., 
Berkeley, CA 94704. Recordings of each site 
should beof a minimum 10 minutes in duration. 



29 



WBAI FREE MUSIC STORE CONCERT; 
IGOR KIPNIS, HARPSICHORD. At the new 

BAI church, concerts are given quite often by 
leading New York performers and composers. 
Here is a recording of one of the best. 



30 



QUADRAPHONIC BROADCAST. Oakland 
Symphony Orchestra; works of Charles Amir- 
khanian, John Cage and Richard Friedman. The 
Cage work is the world premiere performance 
(1970, Davis, California) of a piece titled 
33 1/3. At 7:30 PM, tune one stereo radio to 
KPFA (94) and another to KQED-FM (88.5) 
(see details, page 10). 



THURSDAY 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

7:30 

METAPHYSICAL TOBACCO 

.IN THE MORNING MIX 

With Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Dennis Allen. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Schumann: Symphony No. 5 
(for String Orchestra, 1943) 
Bernstein, New York Phil 
'Columbia MS 7442 (18) 

Edward Applebaum: Montages 
for Clarinet, Cello and Piano 
(1968), Montagnana Trio 
'Everest 3262 (9) 
J.C. Bach: Sinfonia in E-flat, 
Op. 9, No. 2 

Lehan, Consortium Musicum 
Odeon C 053 28 396 (14) 

Schumann: Symphony No. 3 
(1941), Bernstein, New 
York Phil, "Columbia 
MS 7442 (31) 

C.F. Abel: Symphony in E-flat 
Lehan, Consortium Musicum 
*Odeon C 053 28 396 (10) 

Beethoven: Trio for Piano, 
Clarinet and Cello, Op. 11, 
in B-flat, Montagnana Trio 
'Everest 3262 (18) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

THE TUDIYALUR PROJECT: 

Denny Smithson of KPFA's Pub- 
lic Affairs Department talks to 
two men who have been involved 
in a joint effort of the Coopera- 
tive League Fund and CARE, Inc. 
The purpose of the project is to 
acquire farm machinery and 
equipment advisory service for 
Indian cooperatives. 



11:45 

FREDERICK STOCK AND THE 

CHICAGO SYMPHONY 

Wagner: Prelude to Act III of 

Lohengrin 
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 5 

in E-flat Emporer with Artur 

Schnabel, pianist 
Enesco: Rumanina Rhapsody 

No. 1, Vintage Recordings 
Prepared and presented by Larry 
Jackson. 
12:45 

BLACK THEATRE: Early 
Black Music and its Influence 
upon the theatre 1800-1930 

A survey of the Afro-American's 
musical contribution to Ameri- 
can Theatre. The program in- 
cludes musical performances by 
members of the Afro-American 
Total Theatre and selections 
from old recordings. Part two 
of a four-part series produced 
for Pacifica by Hazel Bryant and 

Gil Jardine. 

1:45 

MALCOLM X: THE BULLET 

OR THE BALLOT 

One of his best known speeches, 
which contributed greatly to the 
new militancy within black or-' 
ganizations and to a new inter- 
national perspective in the black 
liberation movement. This pro- 
gram was produced for WBAI 
by Charles Hobson and Roberta 
Kurland. (KPFA Archives) 

3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW RELEASES 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'§ 

5:00 JAPANESE PRESS 
REVIEW 

5:15 CALENDAR OF 
EVENTS 

5:30 MUSIC REVIEW 

Charles Amirkhanian 

6:00 COMMENTARY 
Robert Pickus 

6:30 KPFA News 

WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'J 



1 



ras r 

7:00 VARIOUS FOLK 

With Larry Bartlett 
The first of a three-part series 
of Woody Guthrie's Library of 
Congress recordings. 

•EAR*RAID*EA 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 

9:00 

ENGLISH CHORAL MUSIC 

OF THE 20TH CENTURY 

A selection from recent stereo 
releases featuring the sound of 
British choruses: The Bach Choir 
King's College Choir, Cambridge; 
and Wandsworth School Boy's 
Choir. We begin with two an- 
thems: / Was Glad, by C.H.H. 
Parry, and God is Gone Up by 
Gerald Finzi. These will be fol- 
lowed by Ralph Vaughan Will- 
liams' Mass Missa Brevis and 
Hymn to St. Peter. The program 
concludes with Five Tudor Por- 
traits by Vaughan Williams. Pre- 
sented by KPFA's choral freak, 
Fred Schmitt. 

11:15 

THE DOOR IN THE WALL 

One of the most beautiful and 
haunting short stories ever writ- 
ten by H.G. Wells. The reader is 
Bobbie Harms. 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

With Jeff Echeverria 



14 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



FRIDAY 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



7:30 f " 

FRIDAY MORNIN(f94.1 

With Denny Smithson. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Robert Pickus. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Witold Rudzinski: Gaude Mater 

Polonia (oratorio) 
October 2, 1944, marked the 
end of the Warsaw Uprising. This 
morning we present a commem- 
orative program presented by 
Wanda Tomczykowska of the 
Polish Arts and Culture Founda- 
tion. The Rudzinski oratorio 
was composed around 1966 and 
is available on the Muza label. 
For details write to KPFA. 



2 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

CHINA: ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT IN A 
HUMAN CONTEXT 

John G. Gurley of the Econo- 
mics Department of Stanford 
University advances the thesis 
that, economic development in 
Communist China must be un- 
derstood as an attempt to a- 
chieve socialism by building up 
the entire country simultaneous- 
ly; down to the lowliest peasant, 
in order to promote the sense of 
equal worth of all persons in the 
society. Other participants de- 
fend capitalist development with 
evidence from programs in the 
Third World. 



12:15 

THE AGE OF AQUARIUS 

The view that our social prob- 
lems will be solved by a particu- 
lar life style is simplistic, since it 
fails to take the political process 
into account, says William Bra- 
den, reporter for the Chicago 
Sun-Times and author of 77?e 
Age of Aquarius. Braden discus- 
ses the cult of relevance, hippies 
and the media's response to the 
cultural revolution with Martin 
Marty, professor of church his- 
tory and associate dean of the 
divinity school at the University 
of Chicago, and Robert Colwell, 
assistant professor of biology at 
the University of California at 
Berkeley. Ken Pierce, lecturer in 
humanities at the U. of Chicago 
is moderator. 
(CONVERSATIONS AT 
CHICAGO) 

12:45 

MARCEL MARCEAU 

IN INTERVIEW 

In this interview, Marcel Marceau, 
the great French mime.talks with 
Richard Schoehner, the head of 
the Performance and the creator 
of "Dionysius in '69". The mu- 
tual exploration and sympathe- 
tic understanding creates an aes- 
thetic event. Produced by Mil- 
ton Hoffman. 
1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Mozart: Oboe Quartet in F, 
K. 370, Gomberg, oboe; 
Galimir, violin; Banat, viola; 
Kouguell, cello 
Decca DL9618 (15) 

Bax: Elegiac Trio for Harp, 
Flute and Viola, Robles Trio 
*Argo ZRG 574 (11) 

Kelly: Toccata for Marimba 
and Percussion (1959) 
Frock, marimba; McKenzie, 
U. Illinois Percussion 
Ensemble, U. Illinois Custom 
Recording Series. CRS 6 (8) 

Mompou: Impressions Intimas 
(1911-14), de Larrocha, 
piano, Decca DL 9815 (16) 



Schoenberg: Quartet No. 1 for 
Strings in d, Op. 7, 
New Vienna String Quartet 
*DGG 139 360 (47) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

I 5:00 BRITISH PRESS I 

* REVIEW * 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

* EVENTS * 

* 5:30 ECOLOGY & * 

* POLITICS I 

* Keith Murray * 

* 5:45 REPORT TO THE * 

* LISTENER * 

* Al Silbowitz * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY * 

* Bruce Franklin , 

* 6:30 KPFA News * 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



rRakJEarRaidtarl 

7:00 

JURA PARIS ROAD 

With Charles Shere. 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

ON STAGE 

LES FAUSSES CONFIDENCES 
By de Marivaux 

A comedy by Marivaux, per- 
formed in French, as played by 
Jean-Louis Barrault, Madeleine 
Renaud and company. Artistic 
direction Max De Rieux. Pro- 
duced in London. 
London International Records 
TW-9 1042/043 

11:00 

DICK GREGORY 

This speech was given June 7, 
1970, at a benefit in San Fran- 
cisco sponsored by the Commi- 
ttee United for Political Prison- 
ers. 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

Music and sometimes talk. 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



15 



SATURDAY 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Bruce Franklin. 

8:45 

REVIEW OF THE 

BRITISH WEEKLIES 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Raga Sindhu Bhairavi 

Ali Akbar Khan, sarod; 

N. Mullick & Ashish 

Kumar, tanpura, 

Capitol T 10497 (20) 
Arriaga: Sinfonia A Gran 

Orquesta, Arambarri, 

Madrid Orch, Decca 

DL 9756 (28) 
Honegger: Symphony No. 5 

"Di Tre Re" (1952) 

Baudo, Czech Phil 

Crossroads 2216 0077 

(22) 
Hindemith: Symphony in E-flat 

(1940), Bernstein, 

New York Phil 

'Columbia MS 7426 (18) 

11:00 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

SAMPLER 

Ellyn Beatty 

11:15 

BARBARA WOLF ON 

JAPANESE FILM 

FURIN KAZAN (UNDER 
THE BANNER OF SAMURAI) 
Mrs. Wolf reviews Inagaki's re- 
markable film and explores the 
reasons for its superiority to the 
director's previous works such as 
CHUSINGURA. 



11:30 
P'ALANTE 

12:00 

REMINISCENCES 
OF A REBEL 

Ben Legere 

12:30 
BOOKS 

Kenneth Rexroth. 

16 



1:00 

EXPANDING THE WAVE 

LENGTH OF HISTORY 

A dialogue between Donald 
James Hemrick, famed physicist 
with the Frontiers of Science 
Fellowship, and astrologer Gavin 
Arthur, dealing with the pro- 
cesses of change and the transi- 
tion from the Piscean to the 
Aquarian Age. 

(A Changes program from the 
KPFA Archives). 

2:00 

FRANK MARTIN: Golgotha 
A concert presented on Septem- 
ber 7, 1969, during the Festival 
de Paris, at Eglise Saint German 
L'Auxerrois. This Passion orator- 
io, which was first performed in 
Geneva in 1949, is heard here 
with the chorus of the University 
of Lausanne and the Orchestre 
Lyrique of the French Radio and 
Television under the direction of 
Robert Faller. The soloists are: 
Renee Defraiteur: Soprano 
Amelia Salvetti: Mezzosoprano 
Pierre-Andre Blaser: Tenor 
Philippe Huttenlocher: Bass 
Andre Vessiere: Bass 
Paulette Zanlonghi: Piano 
Andre Luy: Organ 
(This program is from the Broad- 
casting Foundation of America 



3 



5:00 

MUSIC OF THE 

ITALIAN MASTERS 

Music for String Orchestra, per- 
formed by the Orchestra San 
Pietro a Majella conducted by 
Renato Ruotolo. 
Pergolesi : Concertino no. 2 in 

G-major 
Albinoni: Concerto in C-major 

no. 9, Op. 9 
Sacchini: Sinfonia "Edipo a 

Colo no" 
Bottesini: Tarantella for contra- 
bass and strings 
Boccherini: Sinfonia in D-minor 
"La casa del diavolo" 



7:00 

SOUNDS OUR FATHERS 

HEARD 

A nostalgic Americana series cul- 
led from deep in the KPFA 
archives. Produced by Byron 
Bryant from his remarkable and 
esoteric collection of old record- 
ings, all of them pre-1925. 



and the r-rench Cultural bervice.) 


7:30 




QUADRAPHONIC 


3:30 
THIN AIR 


BROADCAST 

Oakland Symphony Orchestra 




concert; new four channel works 


4:30 


of John Dinwiddie, Jan Pusina, 


GOLDEN VOICES 


OPEN, Richard Friedman. Tune 


WITH ANTHONY BOUCHER 

Precious sopranos 


one stereo radio to KPFA (94) 
and the other to KQED-FM 


MS 2.684 


(88.5) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'S 

6:00 COMMENTARY 
Henry Anderson 

6:30 KPFA News 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



11:00 

SOLEDAD THREE: 

PART I, THE MEN 

This is the first in a series of 
three special reports, produced 
at KPFK in Los Angeles, on the 
Soledad Brothers case. On this 
first program are interviews with 
the families and attorneys of the 
Soledad Brothers.the three black 
men accused of killing a white 
guard at Soledad prison. 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

All nightijazz with Bert Thomas. 



SUNDAY 

8*00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Cowell: Symphony No. 11, 
"7 Rituals of Music" 
Whitney, Louisville Orch 
Columbia KL 5039 (21) 

Mozart: Concerto No. 1 in F, 
K. 37, Anda, piano; 
Salzburg Mozarteum 
Ensemble 
*DGG 139 447 (17) 

Schumann: Carnaval, Op. 9 

Freire, piano, 

*Columbia MS 7307 (22) 
Hiller and Baker: Computer 

Cantata (1963), Hamm, 

soprano; McKenzie, U. 

Illinois Chamber Players 

*Heliodor HS 25053 (23) 
Ravel: Daphnis et Chloe 

Monteux, London Sym and 

Chorus 

* London STS 15090 (52) 

11:00 

JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 

THEWAYLESSWAY: 
A MEDITATION BEING 
With JACK GAR ISS 



4 



2:00 
OFFENBACHIANA 

A potpourri of scenes, arias and 
ensembles from the intrepid Of- 
fenbach vaudevilles — 
NOT TO MENTION selections 
from the rare film biography of 
Offenbach (with Yvonne Prin- 
temps and Pierre Fresnay). 
Presented by Melvin Jahn on his 
birthday. (Melvin's....send gifts.) 

WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

* * 

* * 



5:30 VIEWS & REVIEWS * 
Eleanor Sully * 

* 

6:30 KPFA NEWS * 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 

SOUNDS OUR 

FATHERS HEARD 

Byron Bryant 

"Recordings of Spain, Mexico 

and Cuba before 1920" 

(KPFA Archives) 



* 5:30 VIEWS & REVIEWS 

* Eleanor Sully 

* 6:30 KPFA News 



7:30 

OPERA REVIEW 

KPFA critics Bill Collins, Carol 
Barclay, and guest reviewers dis- 
cuss recent 1970 San Francisco 
Opera productions. 

8:15 

TESTAMENT FOR 
MY STUDENTS 

Kay Boyle talks with Eleanor 
Sully about her life and work, a- 
bout the black movement, the 
strike at San Francisco State 
College, her students, and Dr. 
Hayakawa. She reads a story and 
a long poem, Testament For My 
Students. 

9:00 

SUNDAY NIGHT 

DOCUMENTARY 

"B.B. King - No. 1 Bluesman" 

Tonight we rebroadcast theaward 
winning KPFA documentary on 
the career of Blues guitarist, B. 
B. King. This program, produced 
by Dan McClosky, includes in- 
terview material with B.B., and a 
wide cross section of his recorded 
music. Because of the length of 
this program. Stays Fresh Longer 
will not be heard again until next 
Sunday night. 



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KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



17 



MONDAY 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



5 



7:30 

WEEKLY MONDAY 

Charles Shere. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of Saturday's com- 
mentary by Henry Anderson 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Harrison: Four Strict Songs 

for 8 Baritones and 

Orchestra, Bingham, soloist; 

Whitney, Louisville Orch 

Louisville LOU 582 (16) 
Harrison: Suite for Violin, 

Piano and Small Orchestra 

(1951), Anahid Ajemian, 

Maro Ajemian, soloists; 

Stokowski, conductor 

CRI 114 (17) 
Ruggles: Men and Mountains 

(1924-35), Strickland, 

Polish National Radio Orch 

CRI SD254 (9) 
Brant: Angels and Devils 

(Concerto for flute solo 

with flute orch), Wilkins, 

soloist; Brant, conductor 

CRI 106 (21) 
Fine: Music for Piano 

(exerpts), Fine, piano 

CRI 106 (10) 
Cowell : Movement for String 

Quartet (Quartet No. 21, 

1934), Beaux Arts String 

Quartet 

CRI 173(4) 
Vincent: Symphony in D 

Louisville LOU 572 (16) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 



11:15 

HOLLAND IN ART AND 

MUSIC 

This program includes a perform- 
ance of two works by Darius Mil- 
haud, his Fourth Symphony and 
La creation du A770rtcfe,performed 
by the Netherlands Chamber Or- 
chestra, conducted by the com- 
poser, who is also interviewed on 
his recent visit to the Nether- 
lands. The program also includes 
discussion of the 25th anniver- 
sary of the Gaudeamus Founda- 
tion, and the appearances of the 
Daytop Theatre Company of 
New York in Holland. 

12:15 

THE CENTER FOR INTER- 
CULTURAL STUDIES 

Mr. M.A. "Mack" Hull, founder 
of the Center, talks to Denny 
Smithson about how it will send 
American high school students 
to Spain for 8 months of accred- 
ited study. 

1:00 
BOOKS 

With Kenneth Rexroth. 
Rebroadcast of Saturday's pro- 
gram. 

1:30 

THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 

THE GUEST OF HONOR 

An outre little exercise in party 
giving written by Howard Pflan- 
zer. Tibor came to meet the 
guest of honor and in the games 
that follow, he's "it". Directed 
by Sarah Sanders with the voices 
of Joanne Hill, Yvon Dihe, 
Charles Woodruff, Angela Cheyne, 
and Lew Petterson as Tibor. 
Technical direction by David 
Rapkin. 
1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last Friday's pro- 
gram. 



3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Antheil: The Wish (opera in 
one act), solists; Bomhard, 
Louisville Orch 
Louisville 564 (54) 

Chopin: Nocturnes, Op. 9; 
Op. 15; Op. 27; Op. 32; 
Novaes, piano 
Vox VBX402 (50) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'§ 

* 5:00 ON FILM * 

* Bob Sitton » 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF 
„ EVENTS 

* 5:30 JUDICIAL REVIEW * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Henry Ramsey * 

* 6:30 KPFA NEWS 

* * 

* * 
WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

7:00 SOVIET PRESS & 
PERIODICALS 
William Mandel 

7:15 OPERA PREVIEW 

Tonight the first of two pro- 
grams previewing Tristan. Pre- 
pared by Michael Barclay. 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 



9:00 

DIMENSION IN BLACK 

SOUND 

With Bob Northern, Sun Ra and 
Verta (WBAI) 

10:00 

WRITERS AND WRITING 

Bay Area novelists, writers and 
poets talk about their writing and 
read passages from newly pub- 
lished work or work in progress. 

11:00 

•INFORMATION 

TRANSMISSION 

MODULATION AND 

NOISE 

Richard Friedman. 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



TUESDAY 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcst of last night's news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

Paul Fagan. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by David Bortin 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Harris: Trio (1934) 

Gerle, violin; Magyar, cello; 

Wallingford, piano 

U.Oklahoma 1 (21) 
Shapey: Evocation (1959) 

Raimondi, violin; Wyner, 

piano; Price, percussion 

CRI 141 (18) 
Da hi: The Tower of Saint 

Barbara, J. Whitney 

Louisville Orch 

Louisville LOU 562 (25) 
Prokofiev: Quartet No. 1, Op. 50 

Quartet No. 2, Op. 92 

Endres Quartet 

*VoxSTPL511.100(47) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula, 
by Bram Stoker. 



11:15 

SOVIET PRESS 
& PERIODICALS 

Rebroadcast of iast night's pro- 
gram with William Mandel. 



11:30 

THE MOVEMENT ON TRIAL: 
AN INTERVIEW WITH JOHN 
FROINES 

John Froines, one of the eight 
defendants in the Chicago con- 
spiracy trial, is now working on 
the Panther Defense Committee 
in New Haven, Connecticut, 
where nine members of the Black 
Panther Party have been charged 
in connection with the death last 
year of Alex Rackley. Mr. Froines 
was in Berkeley early in August, 
and he was interviewed in the 
KPFA studios by Elsa Knight 
Thompson and Bill Northwood. 

12:45 

BLACK THEATRE - II 

The Afro-American Total Theatre 
Company in On Being Black in 
White America a musical docu- 
mentary on the Afro-American 
experience from the slave ship 
to the present. Directed by 
Hazel Bryant. Produced by Gil 
Jardine. 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 



7:00 ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 
7:30 EYEVIEW 

Bay Area Scene 

•EAWBAID'EA 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 

9:00 

LIVE MUSIC FROM ALI 

AKBAR COLLEGE 

We hear a solo tabla performance 
by Shankar Ghosh, followed by 
the extraordinary playing of 
flutist G.S. Sachdev, recently ar- 
rived from India. This is another 
live stereo broadcast from our 
studios. 

11:00 

CONVERSATIONS WITH A 

GOLLYWOG 

A radio drama by Alexander 
Guyan, originally produced by 
the North American Broadcasting 
Corporation. (KPFA Archives) 

12:00 

*INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

DeLeon Harrison. 



3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 

Host Michael Barclay plays selec- 
tions from the first complete re- 
cording of Berlioz' Les Troyans. 
This is the first of two programs Mr. 
Barclay is devoting to this historic 
new release. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF * 
EVENTS 

DRAMA & * 

LITERATURE I 

REVIEW * 
Eleanor Sully 

COMMENTARY * 

David Bortin * 

KPFA News * 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



19 



WEDNESDAY 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

7:30 

METAPHYSICAL TOBACCO 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

With Jim Emdy. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary with David Bortin. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Scriabin: Sonata No. 5, Op. 53 

Bean, piano 

'Westminster WST 17161 

(12) 
Webern: 6 Pieces for Orchestra, 

Op. 6, Rosbaud 

SW German Orch 

Westminster W 9709 (12) 
Brahms: Piano Quartet No. 2 in 

A, Op. 26, Demus, piano; 

Barylli Quartet members 

Westminster W 9050 (47) 
Beverly Sills sings arias of 

Massenet, Charpentier, 

Hamlet Sills, soprano; 

Mackerras, Royal Phil Orch 

*Westminster WST 17163 (30) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

THE LAW AND THE 

COMMUNITY 

A discussion between Mildred 
Dweck, Catherine Krouser, Rob- 
ert Lefcourt and Eric Seitz con- 
cerning a course set up by United 
Welfare League at Columbia Uni- 
versity, Prospectives for Radical 
Change. (MARTIN LUTHER 
KING SPEAKS) 



11:45 

ARISTOTLE AND 
MODERN POETRY 

When the modern poet's vision 
is too personal and arcane to be 
intelligible to his audience, his 
art fails, says Constantine Try- 
panis, university professor of 
classical languages and literatures 
at the University of Chicago. On 
the other hand, poets like T.S. 
Eliot and Dylan Thomas exem- 
plify the remarkably balanced 
view found in Aristotle's Poetics 
art must express the artist's in- 
ternal vision through externally 
recognizable forms. 

12:45 

DUTCH CONCERT HALL 

G. Gabrteli : Canzone for 3 

instrumental groups 
C. Debussy (Arr. E. Ansermet): 

Six epigraphes antiques 
Bela Bartok: Concerto for violin 

and orchestra, violin soloist: 

Henryk Szeryng 

Bernard Haitink; Amsterdam 

Concertgebouw Orchestra 
STEREO 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 



3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Burgmuller: La Peri (ballet) 
Bonynge, London Sym 
Orch 
'London CS 6627 (64) 

Telemann: Overture in D for 
Trumpet, Oboe, Strings & 
Continuo, Douatte, Paris 
Collegium Musicum 
'Nonesuch H 71091 (27) 

Mendelssohn: Quartet No. 7 for 
Strings, Op. 81, "Unfinished" 
European Quartet 
*VoxSVBX581 (11) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

* 5:00 RESTAURANT 

* REVIEW 

* Michael & Carol 

* Barclay 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF 
. EVENTS 

* 5:30 CAVEAT EMPTOR 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Cy Schoenf ield 

* 6:30 KPFA NEWS 

* 

WHAT'S HAPPENING # WHAT'S 



7:00 ODE TO GRAVITY 

With Charles Amirkhanian 
The student should read the in- 
troductory note on page 323. 
There are no limits to this 
method. 

•EAIt>RAID*EA 




10:30 

GETTING IT TOGETHER 

Dr. George Jackson, a prominent 
black psychologist, speaks on the 
struggle for black liberation. The 
speech waT "delivered on Feb- 
ruary 27th at Merritt College, 
following two days of classroom 
visits. Dr. Jackson, who is blind 
is on the faculty of New York 
University and is assistant dir- 
ector of the Newark, New Jer- 
sey Manpower Training Skills 
Center. 



12:00 
CLASSICAL MUSIC 



20 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



THURSDAY 



8 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:30 

METAPHYSICAL TOBACCO 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

With Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Cy Schoenfield. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Dvorak: Romance in f, Op. 1 1 

Suk, violin; Ancerl, Czech 

Phil Orch 

Artia ALP 193(13) 
Cage: Tossed As It Is Untroubled 

A Valentine out of Season; 

Root of an Unfocus; 

Two Pieces 1946 

Kirstein, piano 

* Columbia M2S819 (23) 
Schubert: Symphony No. 9 in C 

Walter, New York Phil 

Columbia M2L 269 (52) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 



12:45 

BLACK THEATRE III 

A continuing series of programs 
dealing with the Black experi- 
ence in America in words and 
music. Featuring Hazel Bryant 
and Gil Jardine. 

1:45 

THE PROSPECTS FOR PEACE 

Malcolm X made this speech a 
few months before he was assass- 
inated in February, 1965. 
(KPFA Archives) 

3:00 

CONCERT OF OPERATIC 

RELEASES 

With Michael Barclay. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

* EVENTS * 
I 5:30 MUSIC REVIEW * 

* Charles Amirkhanian * 

I 6:00 COMMENTARY * 

* Hal & Anne Draper * 

* 6:15 RADIO ALCATRAZ * 

* 6:30 KPFA NEWS * 
WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 MUSIC IN AMERICA 
With Chris Strachwitz. 

•EAR'RAIO'EA 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

KPFA's nightly in-depth explora- 
tion of current issues and ideas. 



9:00 

OAKLAND SYMPHONY 

IN STEREO 

Gerhard Samuel conducts this 
concert recorded by KPFA's 
George Craig, October 1969. 
Terry Riley:.//? C (1964) 
Beethoven: Leonore Overture 

No. 3inC, Op. 72A (1806) 
Richard Strauss: Don Juan 

Op. 20 (1888) 
Brahms: Concerto for Piano 

and Orchestra No. 1 in d 
Op. 15 (1858), William Mas- 

selos, pianist 
Extra feature: Charles Amirk- 
hanian interviews Terry Riley 
during intermission. 



11:15 

DISSENT IN ACTION 

The Honorable Ramsey Clark, 
former Attorney-General of the 
United States, talks about the 
necessity for advancing social 
justice. He believes that while 
the individual's right to dissent 
must be tolerated, if the individ- 
ual, doing what he thinks is 
right, is in violation of the law, 
he must be prepared to pay the 
price of the law. Interviewing 
Ramsciy Clark at the Center for 
the Study of Democratic Insti- 
tutions is Donald McDonald, 
Executive Editor of The Center 
Magazine. 

11:45 

FREE MUSIC STORE 

Electronic Music and the Ren- 
aissance Love Sandwich. 
STEREO (WBAI) 



11:00 

THE ANGOLAN LIBERATION 

MOVEMENT 

A talk given by Jose Condesse, 
whose guerilla name is Y. Toka, 
and who is Commander of the 
Third Region (Eastern Angola). 
He describes the struggles of his 
people in their fight for indepen- 
dence from Portugal in this talk 
given in Berkeley on July 23rd. 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

With Jeff Echeverria 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



21 



FRIDAY 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



7:30 

FRIDAY MORNING 94.1 

With Denny Smithson. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Hal & Anne Draper. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Jez: Do Fraig Amors (cantata) 

Lebic, Chorale de Chambre 

Radio-TV Ljubljana 

KPFA tape (15) 
Bizet: Jeux d'Enfants Demus, 

Badura-Skoda, piano 4 hands 

Music Guild M 22 (20) 
Chausson: Unfinished Quartet 

Parrenin Quartet 

KPFA tape (31) 
Villa-Lobos: Uirapuru (1917) 

Stokowshi, NY Stadium 

Orchestra 

* Everest 3016 (14) 
Elinor Remick Warren: Abram 

in Egypt, Lewis, baritone; 

Wagner, Roger Wagner 

Chorale; London Phil 

Orchestra 

CRI 172 (20) 

This morning's concert begins 
with a very beautiful choral work 
by the young Yugoslav composer 
Jakob Jez. Don't miss this! 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by- Bram Stoker. 



11:15 

A CONCERT OF 

INDIAN MUSIC 

Nikhil Banerjee, sitar; Ashish 
Khan, sarod; Mahapurush Misra, 
tabla visited KPFA twice in July 
and September, 1967. They re- 
corded Alap in Raga Chandra- 
daus, a demonstration lecture, a 
slow and fast ghat, and Raga: 
Khammaj. The program was re- 
corded by George Craig and 
Wayne Wagner, and introduced 
by Howard Hersh. 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Deli us: Idyll— I Once Passed 

Through a Populous City 

Fisher, soprano; Walters, 

baritone; Barbirolli, 

Halle Orchestra 

'Everyman SRV 240 (22) 
Schubert: 5 German Dances, 7 

Trios and Coda 

Prohaska, Vienna State 

Opera Orchestra 

Vanguard VRS 435 (15) 
Litolff : Concerto Symphonique 

No. 4, Op. 102-Scherzo 

only, Mitchell, piano; 

Golschmann, Vienna State 

Opera Orchestra 

Vanguard VRS 1078 (7) 
Ysaye: Sonatas Nos. 2 & 3 for 

Violin Solo 

Bress, violin 

Alpha DB 132 (16) 
Delius: Prelude to Irmelin; First 

Cuckoo; Intermezzo; 

Paradise Garden, Barbirolli, 

Halle Orchestra 

'Everyman SRV 240 (26) 
Caamano: Magnificat, Op. 20 

(1955), Southern Baptist 

Theological Seminary Choir; 

Whitney, Louisville Orchestra 

Louisville LOU 563 (19) 



9 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



I 5:00 BRITISH PRESS 

* REVIEW 
I 5:15 CALENDAR OF 

* EVENTS 

* 5:30 SCIENCE & 

* ENGINEERING 

* REVIEW 

* Marve Hyman 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Dick Meister 

* 6:30 KPFA News 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 

STRANGE LANDS & 

FRIENDLY PEOPLE 

Produced by Doreen Hansen. 

•EAR'RAID'EA 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

KPF A's nightly in-depth explora- 
tion of current issues and ideas. 

9:00 

ON STAGE 

THE BALCONY 
By Jean Genet 

Genet's electrifying dramatic 
parable of the modern world, 
performed in English by a cast 
headed by Pamela Brown and 
Cyril Cusack. Directed by Ho- 
ward Sackler. 
CaedmonTRS316S STEREO 



12:00 

THE REPORTERS 

Produced by LeVandis Butler. 



22 



'KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



SATURDAY 



10 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Dick Meister. 

8:45 

REVIEW OF THE 

BRITISH WEEKLIES 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Bach: Cantata No. 10, BMV 10 
Ameling, soprano; Watts, 
contralto; Krenn, tenor; 
Rintzler, bass; Vienna Aca- 
demy Choir; Munchinger, 
Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra 
'London OS 26103 (22) 

Kodaly: Galanta Dances de 
Sabata, Berlin Philharmonic 
Heliodor 2548 703 (15) 

Kadosa: Symphony No. 4, Op. 
53 (1960), Erdelyi, Hungarian 
State Orchestra 
Qualiton LPX 1139 (27) 

Brahms: Symphony No. 4 in e, 
Op. 98 de Sabata, Berlin 
Philharmonic 
Heliodor 2548 703 (38) 

11:00 

CHILDREN'S BOOK 
SAMPLER 

Ellyn Beatty 

11:15 

BARBARA WOLF ON 
JAPANESE FILM: KWAIDAN 
Mrs. Wolf discusses the uncut 
version of Kobayashi's horror 
classic, Kwaidan, and speculates 
about the causes for its sudden, 
surprising popularity. 

11:30 
P'ALANTE 

12:00 

DOMINIC BEHAN 

IN WORD AND SONG 

Irish writer Dominic Behan (bro- 
ther of the late Brendan Behan) 
talks and sings about the civil 
rights movement in Northern 
Ireland while Bill Northwood of 
KPFA tries to conduct a straight 
interview. Brian Heron of the 
National Association for Irish 
Justice is also a participant. 



12:30 
BOOKS 

Kenneth Rexroth 

1:00 

A PSYCHIC LOOKS AT DRUGS 

A clairvoyant tells why she ad- 
vises people not to use drugs and 
relates numerous anecdotes in 
support of her opinions. 

3:30 
THIN AIR 

4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES 

WITH ANTHONY BOUCHER 

Marcel Journet 
MS 2.685 

5:00 

THE RECORDED ART OF 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 

More vintage recordings by Dr. 
Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 
Satie: Gymnopedie No. 3 (Orch- 
estrated by Debussy) 
Debussy: La Mer 
Roy Harris: Symphony 1933 
Prepared and presented by Larry 
Jackson. 

WHAT'S HAPPENIMG* WHAT'S 

* * 

* * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Steve Murdock 

* # 

* 6:30 KPFA News 

* * 

* * 

WHAT'S HAPPENING "WHAT'S 

7:00 

SOUNDS OUR FATHERS 

HEARD 

Documentary on the day Charles 
A. Lindburgh returned to the 
U.S.A. 

7:30 

INTERVIEW WITH 
GEORGE DEMMERLE 

This is an impromtu press con- 
ference with FBI informer 
George Demmerle recorded at 
the Silent Majority Mobilization 
Committee Rally, May 22, 1970. 
Participating are WBAI's Bill 
Schechner, and three other news- 
men. 



8:00 

19 NECROMANCERS 
FROM NOW 

Four contributors to a new an- 
thology of Third World writing, 
edited by Ishmael Reed and tit- 
led/9 Necromancers From Now, 
talk about the book, about their 
work and the problems of non- 
white artists. Al Young, black 
novelist and poet, moderates the 
discussion. Other participants 
are Glenn Myles, a black artist 
and poet who illustrated the 
book, Frank Chin, Chinese Amer- 
ican novelist, and Paul Lofty, 
a black novelist, all of whom live 
and work in the Bay Area. 

9:00 

OAKLAND SYMPHONY 

IN STEREO 

Mozart: Magic Flute Overture 

(1791) 
Mahler: Symphonic Movement, 
"Blumine", from Symphony 
No. 1 in D (1888), West 
Coast Premier 
Bartok: Concerto for Violin 
and Orchestra No. 2 (1938) 
Ivry Gitlis, violin 
Austin: Open Style for Orch- 
estra with Piano Soloist 
and "Carthasis": Open 
Style for Two Improvisa- 
tion Ensembles, Tapes and 
Conductor, Robert Floyd, 
pianist. West Coast Pre- 
mier 
Ravel : Suite No. 2 from the 
Ballet Daphnis et Chloe, 
Gerhard Samuel conducts. 
Recorded in Dolby stereo by 
KPFA's George Craig on Novem- 
ber 13, 1969, at Oakland Aud- 
itorium. 
11:00 

SOLEDAD THREE: 
PART II -THE PRISON 
This program, the second in a 
three-part series from KPFK in 
Los Angeles, contains an inter- 
view with the superintendent 
of the Soledad Correctional 
Training Facility, C.J. Fitzharris. 
Also on the program is a discus- 
sion by Fay Stender,the attorney 
for George Jackson, one of the 
Soledad Brothers. 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

All night jazz with Bert Thomas 



23 



SUNDAY 

8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

PIANO MUSIC OF CARL 

NIELSEN 

Arne Skjold Rasmussen, Danish 

pianist, performs the following 

piano works of Carl Nielsen 

(1865-1931). 

Suite, Op. 45; 

Five Piano Pieces, Op. 3; 

Humoresque-Bagatelles, Op. 1 1 ; 

Symphonic Suite, Op. 8; 

Festpraeludium; 

Chaconne, Op. 32; 

Theme and Variations, Op. 40 

Three Piano Pieces, Op. 59 

Posthumous; 

Piano Music for Young and 

Old-24 Little 5-Note Pieces 

in All Keys, Op. 53. 

11:00 

JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 

THE WAYLESS WAY: 

With JACK GARISS 



11 



2:00 

DAS LIEBESVERBOT: 

RICHARD WAGNER 
Robert Heger conducts in this 
little-known work of Wagner. In- 
troduced by our own Bill Collins. 
Friederich: Heinz Imdahl 
Luzio: Kurt Equiluz 
Claudio: Anton Dermota 
Isabella: Hilde Zadek 
Marianne: Christiane Sorell 
Dorella: Hanny Steffek 
Brighella: Ludwig Welter 
Antonio: Willy Friederich 
Angelo: Ernst Salzer 
Danieli: Franz Handlos 
Pontio: Herbert Prikopa 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



* 5:30 VIEWS & REVIEWS * 

* Eleanor Sully * 

* fi-3fl KPFA Npvus * 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 

SOUNDS OUR 
FATHERS HEARD 

Byron Bryant 

"Famous Countertenors of 50- 

60 Years Ago." 

(KPFA Archives) 

7:30 

OPERA REVIEW 

KPFA critics Bill Collins, Carol 
Barclay, and guest reviewers dis- 
cuss recent 1970 San Francisco 
Opera productions. 

8:15 

SOLEDAD EARPHONES 

A documentary of recordings 
made inside Soledad Prison on 
August 25th, during an open 
house for the press. These largely 
unedited recordings are being pre 
sented with the notion that little 
should be cut from this first 
chance that any prisoners in 
California's history have had to 
speak feely on a massive basis. 
The program also includes com- 
ments on California's prison sys- 
tem made by Huey P. Newton, 
of the Black Panther Party during 
a press conference held in August 
at KPFA. Recorded and produced 
by Denny Smithson. 




10:00 

SPRAY FIRST LIGHTLY 

Tonight, a program including 
some tapes from recent Tuesday . 
night auditions at Fillmore West. 



24 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



MONDAY 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



12 



7:30 

WEEKLY MONDAY 

Charles Shere. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of Saturday's com- 
mentary by Steve Murdock. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Mozart: Concerto for Clarinet 
and Orchestra, K. 622 
Marcellus, clarinet; Szell, 
Cleveland Orchestra 
Columbia ML 6368 (29) 

Schubert: Fantasia in C for 
Piano and Violin, Op. 159 
D. 934, Francescatti, 
violin; Bagnoli, piano 
Columbia ML 6229 (23) 

Carter: String Quartet (1951) 
Walden Quartet 
Columbia ML 5104 (40) 

Dello Joio: Variations and 
Capriccio for Violin and 
Piano, Travers, violin; 
Dello Joio, piano 
Columbia ML 4845 (14) 



1:30 

THE GREAT GOLDEN 

RECORD HOAX 

An excerpt from WBAI's At the 
Risk of Seeming Ridiculous. The 
WBAI music department— Eric 
Salzman, Mike Sahl, Dan Kava- 
naugh— open Mike's new Golden 
Record and play it on the air. 
(WBAI) 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last Friday's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Binkerd: Symphony No. 1 

(1954), van Remoortel, 

St. Louis Symphony 

Orchestra 

'Columbia MS 6291 (25) 
Lieberson: String Quartet 

(1938), Galimir Quartet 

'Columbia MS 6421 (15) 
Haydn: Symphony No. 90 in 

C, Jones, Little Orchestra 

of London 

'Nonesuch H 71191 (25) 
Strauss: Serenade in E-flat 

Major for Band, Op. 7 

(1881), Fennel, Eastman 

Wind Ensemble 



7:15 OPERA PREVIEW 

Tonight Michael Barclay con- 
cludes his brief series on Tristan. 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 

9:00 

DENNIS DUNN READS 

some strange & wierd & marvel- 
ous sounds 

9:15 

THE MIND'S EYE THEATRE: 
THERE'S A LITTLE AMBIGUITY 
OVER THERE AMONG THE 
BLUEBELLS 

A series of poemsplays by Ruth 
Krauss make up this final pro- 
duction of the Word Players. 
"This is a Krauss sampler disor- 
ganized to turn you on to the 
possibilities of selection and jux- 
taposition..." specialties of the 
Word Players, who are David 
Haight, Susan Miller, Sherry 
Pockell, Ann Rivers, Julie Scher- 
er, and Edgar Walker, directed 
by Baird Searles. Technical prod- 
uction by David Rapkin. TALA- 
OTATB is published by Some- 
thing Else Press and used by the 



10:45 




'Mercury SR 90173 (10) 




dumui b kiiiu ijeriiiibbiuii. 


MORNING READING 


Stravinsky: Symphony in E- 






John Bovingdon reads Dracula 




flat, Op. 1 (1905-7) 




10:00 


by Bram Stoker. 




Stravinsky, Columbia 
Symphony Orchestra 




WRITERS AND WRITING 

Bay Area novelists, writers and 


11:15 




'Columbia MS 6989 (35) 




poets talk about their writing and 


C The dramatic production by Pau 








read passages from newly pub- 


Claudel, with music by Darius 
Milhaud, and starring Madeleine 


/VHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'§ 


lished work or work in progress. 


Renaud and Jean-Louis Barrault 


i 


5:00 ON FILM 


* 

4c 


11:00 


A London International Record- 


» 


Bob Sitton 


* 


♦INFORMATION 


ing, TW-91 084/5. 


* 
* 
* 


5:15 CALENDAR OF 
EVENTS 


* 
* 
* 


TRANSMISSION 
MODULATION AND 




t 




* 


NOISE 


1:00 


* 


5:30 CONFERENCE 


* 


Richard Friedman. '. 


BOOKS 


* 


WASHINGTON 


» 




With Kenneth Rexroth. 


* 
it 


6:00 COMMENTARY 


* 
* 




Rebroadcast of Saturday's pro- 


» 


Mike Culbert 


• 




gram. 


* 
* 


6:30 KPFA News 


* 
* 






WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 








7:00 SOVIET PRESS & 










PER: vqICALS 










Willi Mandel 






KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 








25 



TUESDAY 



13 



7:00 
KPFANEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

Paul Fagan. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Peter Shapiro. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Ben Weber: Fantasia, Op. 25 

(1946), Masselos, piano 

Epic LC 3567 (9) 
William Mayer: Piano Sonata 

(1960), Masselos, piano 

CRI 198 (19) 
Vitali: Chacon ne; Veracini: 

Sonata in A, Op. 1, No 7 

Grumiaux, violin; 

Castagnone, piano 

Epic LC 3414 (24) 
Mozart: Exsultate, Jubilate, 

K. 165, Raskin, soprano; 

Szell, Cleveland Orchestra 

Columbia ML 6025 (16) 
Liszt: Sonata in b 

Horowitz, piano 

Seraphim 60114 (27) 
Schumann: Adagio and 

Allegro, Op. 70, Brain, 

horn; Moore, piano 

Seraphim 60040 (9) 
Schumann: Presto Passionato, 

Op. 22, Horowitz, piano 

Seraphim 60114 (6) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

SOVIET PRESS 

& PERIODICALS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram with William Mandel. 



11:30 

RAP WITH AN 

EX-CON 

Pete Werbel, an ex-inmate of Sol- 
edad, talks with Hal Leven about 
his experiences in jail and condi- 
tions in prisons in California in 
general. 

12:45 

BLACK THEATRE - IV 

A continuing survey of the Black 
experience as expressed in the 
theatre, featuring Hazel Bryant 
Executive Director of the Afro- 
American Total Theatre Arts 
Foundation. Produced for Pac- 
ifica by Gil Jardine. 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram 

3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW RELEASES 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

* 5:00 GERMAN PRESS * 

* REVIEW * 
m Helga Lohr Bailey 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

* EVENTS * 

* 5:30 DRAMA & * 

* LITERATURE * 

* REVIEW * 

* Eleanor Sully » 



6:00 



6:30 



COMMENTARY 
Peter Shapiro 

KPFA News 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 
7:30 FILM REVIEW 

•EAR'RAID'EA 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 

9:00 

NEW MUSIC PREVIEW 

Howard Hersh previews the open- 
ing concert of the New Music 
Ensemble's 1970-71 season to be 
held Friday evening October 16, 
(8:30pm) in the DeYoung Mu- 
seum, San Francisco. The pro- 
gram will include performances 
of Stockhausen'sS/7orfi/i/ai/es and 
Cage's Winter Music with Atlas 
Eclipticalis featuring pianist Yuji 
Takahashi, as well as works by 
Paik, Logothetis and Matsushita. 

10:30 

OPEN FORUM ON THE 

SOVIET UNION 

Three Soviet journalists who vis- 
ited San Francisco in June, 1970, 
as part of the cultural exchange 
program between the U.S. and 
the U.S.S.R. answer questions 
posed by a panel which included 
KPFA's William Mandel and by 
members of the audience. The 
forum was held on the Berkeley 
campus of the University of Cal- 
ifornia and was moderated by 
the co-chairman of S.U.P.E.R.B., 
Joe Beezy, who introduces the 
participants. 

12:00 

*INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

DeLeon Harrison. 



Company 

Finest professional facilities 
Multiple-track recordings on location 
Economy rates 349 * 5880 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



WEDNESDAY 



14 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

7:30 

METAPHYSICAL TOBACCO 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

With Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Peter Shapiro. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Schoeck: Concerto in B-flat 
Op. 21, for Violin and 
Orchestra, Lehmann, 
violin; De Stoutz, Zurcher 
Orchestra 
Mace MCS 9047 (33) 

Schubert: Songs for the Male 
Chorus, Grossmann, 
Akademie Kammerchor 
Lyrichord LL 99 (20) 

Dufay: Missa "L' Homme 
Arme", Gilchrist, Berkeley 
Chamber Singers 
'Lyrichord LLST 7150 (36) 

Schoeck: Concerto for Horn 
and Strings, Op. 65 
Brejza, horn; De Stoutz, 
Zurcher Orchestra 

*Mace MCS 9047 (17) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

BANDURA MUSIC I 

Ukranian Bandura Music per- 
formed by Dr. S. Shtokalko. 
Produced by Leo Maystrenko. 
(WBAI) 

12:15 

WOMEN OF CONSCIENCE: 

WHAT ARE YOU DOING? 

A speech made by Coretta Scott 
King at a Women's Day Obser- 
vance. This program is in recog- 
nition of Woman's Suffrage Day 
on August 26th and the Nation- 
wide Strike for Equality. 



12:45 

THE NEW THEATRE: 

A EUROPEAN VIEW 

Martin Esslin, Director of Radio 
Drama for the BBC and noted 
critic discusses the dying art of 
Radio Drama, the future of 
theatre and The Peopled Wound 
his soon to be published study 
of the works of Harold Pinter 
with Gil Jardine. 

1:15 

THE LONG TRIP BACK 

—an examination of the.Odessey 
Drug Treatment facility in New 
York City and the teenage her- 
oin addicts who use it. 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Schoenberg: Verklarte Nacht 

Op. 4, Desarzens, 

Chamber Orchestra of 

Lausanne 

Music Guild MS 811 (31) 
Riegger: New Dance, Op. 18b, 

Prokofiev: Divertimento, 

Op. 43; Copland: Letter 

from Home (1944) 

Eger, Vienna Radio 

Orchestra 

*Music Guild MS 858 (28) 
Kubik: Sonatina for Piano 

(1941), Dahl, piano 

Contemporary M 6013 (7) 
Wagenseil: Concerto for Cello, 

Strings and Continuo in A 

Mainardi, cello; Mainardi, 

Munich Orchestra 

Archive ARC 3110 (22) 

Wartensee: Der durch Musik 
uberwundene Wuterich 
Hoffmann, glass harmonica; 
Neumeyer, Forte piano 
Archive ARC 3111 (12) 



WHAT' 
I 5:00 



5:15 



*5:30 
*6:00 

* 6:30 



S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 
RESTAURANT • 

REVIEW * 

Michael & Carol Barclay* 

CALENDAR OF * 

EVENTS * 

MILITARY MONITOR I 

COMMENTARY * 

Sylvia M. Siegal * 

KPFA News * 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



rRaidEarRaidEarRaidEarRaklEarF 
7:00 ODE TO GRAVITY 

With Charles Amirkhanian 
Nainahkrima selrahc htiw 
YTIVARG OT EDO. 

•EAR'RAID'EA 




11:00 

McCLOSKY'S GOT A BRAN' 

NEW BAG 

12:00 

BEYOND DEATH - 
REFRACTIONS 

Movements: Death as in a dream/ 
the fall out of time /disorienta- 
tion and remembrance/the stream/ 
universal language/the maternal 
labyrinth/the reincarnate. 
Performed Oct. 17, 1969, on the 
organ of the Calvary Church in 
New York City, and recorded for 
Pacifica by John Ackley. 
STEREO (WBAI) 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



27 



THURSDAY 15 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

7:30 

METAPHYSICAL TOBACCO 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

With Jim Emdy. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Sylvia M. Siegel. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Schoenberg: Wind Quartet 

Op. 26, Westwood Wind 

Quartet 

'Columbia M2S 762 (35) 
Copland: In the Beginning 

Gregg Smith Singers 

'Everest 3129 (17) 
Hindemith: Harmony of the 

Universe Symphony 

Hindemith, Festival 

Symphony Orchestra 

'Everest 3226 (35) 
Schuman: Carols of Death; 

Barber: Reincarnation; 

Gregg Smith Singers 

'Everest 3129 (22) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 



11:15 

BANDURA MUSIC II 

Performed by Dr. S. Shtokalko. 
Produced by Leo Maystrenko. 
(WBAI) 

12:15 
SURVIVAL 

Eddie Albert, actor and conser- 
vationist, has been eye witness 
to the tragic effects of our indis- 
criminate violation of nature. He 
describes the perils of pollution 
to a gathering of members of the 
Canter for the Study of Demo- 
cratic Institutions and under- 
scores the need to turn the dan- 
ger signals into opportunities for 
sjrvival. 

12:45 

TWO YOUNG WRITERS 

Anita Barrows, poet, and Allan 
Frankel, prose writer, read from 
their own work and talk with 
Eleanor Sully about their approa- 
ches to writing. 

1:45 

MEMORIAL FOR 
MALCOLM X 

A special memorial program held 
in New York City at which many 
prominent black leaders deliver- 
ed brief remarks. 
(KPFA Archives) 

3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW RELEASES 




WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

* * 

* 5:00 JAPANESE PRESS * 

* REVIEW * 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

* EVENTS * 

* 5:30 MUSIC REVIEW 

Charles Amirkahnian * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

Dennis Allen * 

* 6:15 RADIO ALCATRAZ * 

* 6:30 KPFA News * 

* * 
WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



arRafeJtar 

7:00 VARIOUS FOLK 

With Larry Bartlett 
The second part of a three-part 
series of Woody Guthrie's Li- 
brary of Congress recordings. 

*EAR*RAID*EA 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

KPFA's nightly in-depth explora- 
tion of current issues and ideas. 

9:00 

OAKLAND SYMPHONY 

IN STEREO 

Gerhard Samuel conducts the 
orchestra in Berlioz' dramatic 
legend, The Damnation of Faust 
with Beverly Wolff, mezzo-so- 
prano; Charles Bressler, tenor; 
Simon Estes, bass-baritone; George 
Baker, bass-baritone, and the Oak- 
land Symphony Chorus (Joseph 
Liebling, director). Recorded 
December 1970 in Dolby stereo 
by KPFA's George Craig. 
11:00 

WHITHER SCIENCE FICTION? 
That's really not what this dis- 
cussion is about, but it's a good 
title. Primarily the talk revolves 
around whether science-fiction 
is really a branch of children's 
literature. Taking part are such 
people of note as Thomas Disch 
(Camp Concentration), Joanna 
Russ (Picnic on Paradise) au- 
thors; Terry Carr, author and ed- 
itor (Ace Science Fiction Spec- 
ials), and Monte Davis, reviewer 
on BAI's U&U. Baird Series pre- 
sides. 



12:00 
AFTERMATH 

With Jeff Echeverria 



28 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



FRIDAY 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



7:30 

FRIDAY MORNING 94.1 

With Denny Smithson 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Dennis Allen. 



1:15 

CORNELUS VAN DEN 

HEUVEL READS HIS POEMS 

The poet read several poems 
from his books 507, The Win- 
dowwasher's Pail, and Water in a 
Stone Depression. 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 



16 



rRaidtarF 

7:00 

JURA PARIS ROAD 

With Charles Shere. 

•EAR'RAID'EA 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 



8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Verdi: La Traviata 

Pilar Lorengar; Giacomo 
Aragall; Dietrich Fischer- 
Dieskau; Maazel 
Deutsche Oper. Orchestra 
and Chorus, Berlin 
* London OSA 1279 (112) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

THE RISE OF 

SOCIAL STATISTICS 

Concepts like "average mortal- 
ity" and "average intelligence' 
imply a view of man and society 
based on probabilities rather 
than on individual facts. This 
view has moral as well as practi- 
cal consequences, says I. Ber- 
nard Cohen, professor of the his- 
tory of Science at Harvard Uni- 
versity. He traces the 19th cen- 
tury origins of modern social 
statistics. (From The Midway). 

12:15 

BUDAPEST MUSIC WEEKS 

1968-1. 

Zoltan.Kodaly: String Quartet 

No. 2 
Bela Bartok: String Quartet 

No. 3 
Bela Bartok: String Quartet 

No. 4 
The Weiner String Quartet 

Josef Szasz, violin; Zoltan 

Sumeghy, second violin; 

Janos Szekacs, viola; Arpad 

Szasz, 'cello. 
Recorded 9/25/68 by Magyar 
radio. Introduced by Warren Van 
Orden. 



3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Beethoven: Egmont Overture 

Giulini, New Philharmonia 

Orchestra 

* Angel S 36684 (9) 
Alfven: Symphony No. 3, 

Op. 23, Grevillius 

Stockholm Philharmonic 

Orchestra 

*Telefunken LT 33161 (34) 
Colgrass: Variations for Four 

Drums and Viola 

Vardi, viola; Colgrass, 

percussion 

MGM E 3714 (18) 
Leedy: Quintet 1964 

Leedy, conductor 

KPFA tape (8) 
Ruggles: Sun Treader 

Rozsnyai, Columbia Sym- 
phony Orchestra 

*Columbia MS 6801 (18) 
Villa-Lobos: Bachianas 

Brasileiras No. 1 

Slatkin, Concert Arts 

Cello Ensemble 

'Capitol SP 8484 (18) 



9:00 

ON STAGE 

NO EXIT 

By Jean-Paul Sartre 

Sartre's vision of hell, adapted 
from the French by Paul Bowles. 
The cast includes Donald Pleas- 
ance, Anna Massey, Glenda Jack- 
son and Thomas Kempinski. Dir- 
ected by Howard Sackler. 

11:00 

THE NORTHERN 
CALIFORNIA PEACE 
INFORMATION FORUM 

The volunteer who edited this 
tape said: "The more I heard 
this tape, the more I liked it. A- 
side from giving particular infor- 
mation about the particular an- 
ti-war group that was being re- 
presented, pertinent and urgent 
questions that are facing the en- 
tire movement today were 
brought up and effectively dealt 
with." The interviewer is Michael 
Goodman. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 12:00 

BRITISH PRESS * AFTERMATH 



5:00 



5:15 



5:30 



5:45 



6:00 



* 6:30 
WHAT'S 



REVIEW * 

CALENDAR OF * 

EVENTS * 

ECOLOGY & * 

POLITICS * 

Keith Murray * 

REPORT TO THE * 

LISTENER * 

Al Silbowitz * 

COMMENTARY I 

Bruce Franklin * 

KPFA News I 
HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



Music and sometimes talk. 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



29 



SATURD 

8:00 


AY 

2:30 


KPFANEWS 


CABLE TELEVISION IN 


Rebroadcast of last night's news. 


BERKELEY: ARE 


8:30 


CIRCUMSTANCES BEYOND 


COMMENTARY 


OUR CONTROL? 


Rebroadcast of last night's com- 


An examination of the cable tel- 


mentary by Bruce Franklin. 


evision system that is to be set 


8:45 


up in Berkeley, focussing on the 


REVIEW OF THE 


opinions of organizations which 


BRITISH WEEKLIES 


are attempting to mobilize senti- 


9:00 


ment in opposition to the pro- 


MORNING CONCERT 


posed system. The program was 


Mussorgsky: Pictures at an 


produced by KPFA Public Af- 


Exhibition, Schippers, 


fairs Volunteer Len Rubenstein. 


New York Philharmonic 




*CBS 3211 (32) 


3:30 


Bartok: Concerto No. 3 for 


THIN AIR 


Piano and Orchestra 




Barenboim. piano: Boulez. 


4:30 


New Philharmonia Orch. 


GOLDEN VOICES 


'*Angel S 36605 (26) 


WITH ANTHONY BOUCHER 


Britten: Part Songs 


Giovanni Martinelli, tenor 


Halsey, Elizabethan Singers 




*Argo RG 424 (50) 


5:00 


11:00 


MUSIC OF THE ■ 

ITAI 1 AM MACTCDC 



17 



CHILDREN'S BOOK 
SAMPLER 

Ellyn Beatty 
11:15 

BARBARA WOLF ON 
JAPANESE FILM: 
PRELIMINARY REMARKS 
ON KUROSAWA 
Mrs. Wolf considers some striking 
but neglected aspects of the dir- 
ector's style, with examples from 
Seven Samurai. 
11:30 
P'ALANTE 

12:00 

REMINISCENCES 
OF A REBEL 
Ben Legere 

12:30 
BOOKS 

With Kenneth Rexroth 
1:00 
CHOPIN COMMEMORATION 

This program features primarily 
songs by Chopin, who died on 
this day in 1849. The perform- 
ances are by Polish singer Ada 
Sari, Stefania Woytowicz and 
Andrzej Bachleda. Also some 
compositions of Chopin per- 
formed on the last piano he 
played, performed here by Prof. 
Abigniew Drzewiecki. Presented 
by Wanda Tomczykowska of the 
Polish Arts and Culture Founda- 
tion. 
30 



ITALIAN MASTERS 

Lorenzo da Firenze, Andrea da 
Firenze, Bartolino da Padova: 
Ballate, sung by the Ars An- 
tiqua di Milano 

D. Scarlatti: Sonatas, L. 219 and 
L. 191; Fernando Valenti, 
harpsichord 

Corelli: La Follia, Yehudi Menu- 
hin, violin; Gerald Moore, 
piano 

Busoni: Toccata (1920), Gunnar 
Johansen, piano 

Giuliani: Sonata, Andres Segov- 
ia, guitar 

Dallapiccola: Variations for 
Orchestra, RAI Orchestra of 
Rome; Massimo Freccia, 
conductor. 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

* * 

* * 

* * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY * 

* * 

„ Father Eugene Boyle * 

* 6:30 KPFA News 



WHAT'S HAPPENING»WHAT'S 

7:00 

SOUNDS OUR FATHERS 

HEARD 

"Give me that Old Time 
Religion" 



7:30 

FEINSTEIN in LOCARNO: 

Boro Draskovic 

Dr. Feinstein talks about Yugo- 
slav cinema with Draskovic, a 
theatre, director in his late 20's 
whose first film, Horoscope, 
played the Swiss film festival. 
Horoscope was also presented at 
the San Francisco and New York 
Film Festivals. Drascovic, now 
an ambitious filmmaker, discus- 
ses several contemporary Yugo- 
slav movies. 

8:15 

ELECTRONIC MUSIC 

With John Payne 

"Wing nut. Feather. Ripe radio- 
coccus. Feline Dagger. BLACK 
DING" - J. Dinwiddie. 

9:00 

OAKLAND SYMPHONY 

IN STEREO 

Edward Applebaum: Symphony 

No. 1 (world premiere) 
Aaron Copland: Lincoln Por- 
trais (Marion Anderson, nar- 
rator) 
Debussy: fragments from The 
Martyrdom of St. Sebastian 
Scriabin: Symphony No. 3, 

"Divine Poem" 
Gerhard Samuel conducts in one 
of the most exciting perform- 
ances imaginable of the Scriabin. 
Don't miss this fine broadcast in 
Dolby stereo, recorded by Chief 
Engineer at KPFA George Craig, 
March, 1970. 

11:00 

SOLEDAD THREE: 

PART III 

This final program in a three- 
part series on the Soledad Broth- 
ers includes a conversation be- 
tween Doris Maxwell, mother of 
one of the Brothers, and Micha 
McGuire of the Soledad Brothers 
Defense Committee. Also on 
this last program are interviews 
with Jim Turner of the Black 
Legislative Caucus, and State 
Senator Mervin Dymally, both 
recorded in Sacramento. This 
series was produced at our Los 
Angeles Pacifica station, KPFK. 

12:00 

THE HERCULES GRYTPYPE- 

THYNNE SHOW. 

KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



SUNDAY 

8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



18 



8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Hovhaness: Concerto No. 7 

for Orchestra 

Whitney, Louisville Orches- 
tra 

Louisville LOU 5454 (21) 
Villa-Lobos: Bach i an as Bras- 

ileiras No. 8 for Large 

Orchestra, Villa-Lobos, 

ORF Orchestra 

Angel 35179 (24) 
Will Johnson: Quartet for 

Flute, Clarinet, Violin and 

Cello 

KPFA tape (8) 
Mennin: Symphony No. 6 

Whitney, Louisville 

Orchestra 

Louisville LOU 5453 (26) 
Amirkhanian: Symphony I 

(1965), Brothers, conductor 

*KPFA tape (11) 
Surinach: Sinfonietta Flamenca 

Whitney, Louisville Orch. 

Louisville LOU 5454 (13) 
Soler: Organ Quintet No. 6 

in g, Fernandez, violin; 

Raymond, violin; Guiet, 

viola; Deferrieux, cello; 

Alain, organ 

Westminster W 9048 (28) 

11:00 

JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 

THE WAYLESS WAY: 
A MEDITATION BEING 
With JACK GARISS 



2:00 

THE SUPERART with Superhost 

MICHAEL BARCLAY 

"Astrid Varnay — The Greatest 
\Wagnerian of Them All!" 
Today's program concerns Swed- 
ish-American dramatic soprano 
Astrid Varnay who since her 
Metropolitan debut at the age of 
21 has sung more performances 
of Wagner's heroines than any 
other singer in history. We hear 
selections from live perform- 
ances at Bayreuth, New York, 
Hamburg, Covent Garden and 
Stuttgart. Miss Varnay is heard 
as Bruennhilde, Isolde, Ortrud, 
Senta, Elisabeth, and Kundry as 
well as Elektra(her greatest role). 
Among her colleagues are Hans 
Hotter, Wolfgang Windgassen, Ra- 
mon Vinay, Anja Silja, Hermann 
Unde and Jess Thomas. Mr. 
Thomas, the world's leading hel- 
dentenor, star of this year's S.D. 
Opera Siegfried not only has 
sung with Astrid Varnay but has 
designed clothes for her as well. 
He will be interviewed by Mr. 
Barclay on today's exciting show. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

* * 

* 5:30 VIEWS & REVIEWS * 

* Eleanor Sully * 

* 6:30 KPFA News * 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 

SOUNDS OUR 
FATHERS HEARD 

Byron Bryant 

"Early Recordings of Dramatic 

Scenes." 

(KPFA Archives) 

7:30 

OPERA REVIEW 

KPFA critics Bill Collins, Carol 
Barclay, and guest reviewers dis- 
cuss recent 1970 San Francisco 
Opera productions. 

8:15 

ANTHROPOCENTRIC AND 
THEOCENTRIC SCIENCE 

Theodore Roszak talks with 
Catherine Roberts about the me- 
thods, morals, and metaphysics 
of science. Catherine Roberts 
is a former microbiologist and 
author of The Scientific Con- 
science, an outstanding critique 
of current biological research. 
The conversation ranges over the 
subjects of animal experimenta- 
tion, ethical evolution and "the 
discipline of the sacred". Re- 
corded at the BBC in London. 

9:00 

SUNDAY NIGHT 
DOCUMENTARY 
"Ralph Gleason and 
Studs Terkel" 

Tonight we present the first of 
three hour long conversations be- 
tween Studs Terkel, author of 
Hard Times, a look at the great 
depression and Division Street 
America, and Ralph Gleason, 
noted jazz and rock music critic, 
who writes for the Rolling Stone 
and the San Francisco Chronicle. 
The second discussion will be 
heard in two weeks at this hour. 



10:00 

SPLAY FOOT TIGER 

From our collection of un-re- 
leased Bob Dylan music. 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



31 



MONDAY 

7:00 
KPFANEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



19 



7:30 

WEEKLY MONDAY 

Charles Shere. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of Saturday's com- 
mentary by Father Eugene Boyle 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Barber: Summer Music 
NY Woodwind Quintet 
*Concert-Disc CS 216 (12) 

Dvorak: The Spectre's Bride 
(complete opera), Tikalova, 
Blachut, Mraz, soloists; 
Krombholc, Czech Phil- 
harmonic 
Artia ALP 196/7 (80) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

JUNG'S CONTRIBUTION TO 
THE IDEA OF INDIVIDUAL 
ROOTS OF WORLD 
SOCIAL NEEDS-1 
A speech given by Dr. Elizabeth 
Howes as part of a panel discus- 
sion sponsored by the Guild for 
Psychological Studies in San Fran- 
cisco. Dr. Howes' talk concerns 1 
the inherited collective uncon- 
scious of modern man. 

11:45 

BUDAPEST MUSIC WEEKS 

1968 

Ferenc Farkas: Sonata no. 3 
Ferenc Farkas: Three Mono- 

gramms Hybrides 
Pal Kadosa: Kaleidoscope 

Three Piano Movements 
Andras Mihaly: Two Piano 

Movements in old style 
Jozef Sari: Six Piano Movements 
Attila Bozay: Bagatels 
Lajos Papp: Improvisation 

Three Rondos 
Pianist Lorand Szucs recorded 
10-11-68 by Magyar Radio 
introduced by Warren Van Orden. 



1:00 
BOOKS 

With Kenneth Rexroth. 
Rebroadcast of Saturday's pro- 
gram. 

1:30 

THREE POEMS By E.B. White 

Eleanor Sully reads E.B. White's 
poems from the volume. The 
Second Tree From the Corner. 



1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last Friday's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT: 

MUSIC OF KAROL 

SZYMANOWSKI 

From a Polish recording on the 
Muza label, we hear Szymanow- 
ski's magnificent opera, King 
Roger. The work, set in the 12th 
Century, was composed 1920-24 
and is in three acts. This program 
includes a speech by Szymanow- 
ski on the occasion of a 1932 
performance of this work. Pre- 
sented by Wanda Tomczykowska 
of the Polish Arts and Culture 
Foundation. 
Roger II, King of Sicily: An- 

drzej Hiolski, baritone 
Roxana, his wife: Hanna Rum- 

owska, soprano 
Edrisi, the Arabian sage: Zdzi- 

slaw Nikodem, tenor 
The Shepherd: Kazimierz Pus- 

telak, tenor 
The Archbishop: Marek Da- 

browski, bass 
The Deaconess: Ann Malewicz- 

Madey, alto 

Mieczyslaw Mierzejewski con- 
ducts the Chorus and Orchestra 
of the Warsaw State Opera House 
and the Children's Chorus of the 
Polish Pathfinders' Union. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'§ 

* * 

* 5:00 ON FILM 

* Bob Sitton 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

* EVENTS * 

* 5:30 JUDICIAL REVIEW * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY * 
*» Tom Hayden * 

* 6:30 KPFA News * 

* * 
WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

7:00 SOVIET PRESS & 
PERIODICALS 
William Mandel 



7:15 OPERA PREVIEW 

Tonight Melvin Jahn considers 
Faust. 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 

9:00 

A LEISURELY TOUR 
THROUGH KEYBOARD 
LITERATURE 

Julian White discusses his recent 
travels, including a Grey Line 
tour of Nem, Kansas. Various 
snapdragons were heard, energet- 
ically ripping their way toward 
the dungeon. A prize-winning 
documentary, tails out. 

10:00 

ON WRITERS AND WRITING: 

LARRY EIGNER, POET 

David Gitin hosts the program 
reading from the work of Larry 
Eigner. Eigner is the author of 
two books of poetry, On My Eyes 
and Another Time In Fragments. 
Another book is to be published 
shortly. 

11:00 

•INFORMATION 

TRANSMISSION 

MODULATION AND 

NOISE 

Richard Friedman. 



32 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



TUESDAY 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

Paul Fagan. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Senator Nicholas Pet- 
ris. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT: 

MUSIC OF KOMITAS 

(1869-1935) 

Komitas was an Armenian musi- 
cian and scholar who was to Ar- 
menia as Bartok was to Hungary. 
This album memorializing the 
hundredth anniversary of his 
birth features performances by 
Armenian-American artists Lu- 
cine Amara (soprano), Cathy 
Berberian (soprano), Lili Chook- 
asian (contralto), Ara Berberian 
(basso), Michael Kermovan (bas- 
so), Vahan Khanzadian (tenor), 
Maro Ajemian (piano), and Alan 
Hovhaness (conductor). TheCam- 
erata Singers of New York are 
the featured chorus. The album 
is available from Komitas Cen- 
tennial Committee, Inc., P.O. 
Box 264, Hempstead, N.Y. Cost 
is for two records plus booklet 
with photographs and complete 
historical and recording data. 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

SO VIET. PR ESS 

& PERIODICALS 
Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram with William Mandel. 

11:30 

THE RECORDED ART OF 

FYODOR SHALYAPIN 

Shalyapin sings songs by Musor- 
gsky, Glinka, Beethoven, Schu- 
mann and others. Prepared and 
produced by Larry Jackson. 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



12:00 

ECOLOGY IN ISRAEL 

Uri Bar— Zemer and Art Lesley 
interview Professor Izaak Harpaz 
on Ecological problems in Israel. 
Professor Harpaz is the chairman 
of the Department of Etomology 
at the Hebrew University in Is- 
rael and spent most of this year 
as a guest lecturer at the Univer- 
sity of California at Berkeley. 

12:30 

THE SUBTLE ART OF 

REJECTION 

Some of the world's greatest and 
most prolific writers (as of yet 
undiscovered) read their favorite" 
rejection notices. Produced for 
the drama and literature depart- 
ment of WBAI by Gil Jardine. 

1:00 

MUSIC OF THE AMERICAN 

INDIANS 

Music of the Crow Creek Sioux. 
Grass Dance Songs, Original 
Sioux Flag Song, Veterans Hon- 
oring Songs, Penny Dance Songs. 
Recorded at Fort Thompson, 
South Dakota by Leonard Met- 
calf, Francis Fire Cloud, Dan 
Fire Cloud, Robert Touche, and 
Hollis Medicine Crow. 
Indian Records IR 1194 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW OPERATIC 

RELEASES 

Michael Barclay. 

This is the second program review- 
ing the historic new release on 
Phillips of a complete Berlioz Les 
Troyans on five stereo discs. Today's 
program features an interview with 
Bergit Lindholm. 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 
I 5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

* EVENTS 




; 5:30 DRAMA & 

* LITERATURE 

* REVIEW 

* Eleanor Sully 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY * 

* Senator Nicholas Petris * 

* 6:30 KPFA News ! 



7:00 ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 
7:30 EYEVIEW 

Bay Area Scene 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 



9:00 

BENNETT TARSHISH 

PRESENTS 

Music of John Ireland 

(1879-1962) 

Sarnia (An Island Sequence) 

Sonata No. 2 for Violin and 

Piano 
Concerto for Piano and 

Orchestra 
John Ireland was an extremely 
lyrical, sensitive English com- 
poser who wrote particularly well 
for the piano. This is a rebroad- 
cast of the first of several pro- 
grams examining his music. 



10:30 

THE FUNERAL OF 
JONATHAN JACKSON 
AND WILLIAM 
CHRISTMAS 

The funeral of Jonathan Jackson 
and William Christmas was held 
at St. Augustine's Episcopal 
Church in Oakland, California, 
on Saturday, August 15, I970. 
It was conducted by David Hill- 
iard, the Chief of Staff of the 
Black Panther Party; Father Earl 
Neil, of St. Augustine's Church; 
and by Huey P. Newton, the 
Minister of Defense of the Black 
Panther Party. 

11:00 

THE BLACK ARTIST 

A program sponsored by the S.F. 
Black Writer's Workshop brings 
Ishmael Reed, novelist and poet, 
Ortiz Walton, musician, and Joe 
Overstreet, painter, into a dis- 
cussion of the tradition of black 
art. 

12:00 

•INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

DeLeon Harrison. 

33 



WEDNESDAY 



21 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 



7:30 

METAPHYSICAL TOBACCO 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

With Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Senator Nicholas 
Petris. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Frederick the Great: Sonata 
No. 2 in c; Sonata No. 5 in 
a Wummer, flute; Valenti, 
harpsichord 

Westminster W 9076 (23) 
Mendelssohn: Sonata No. 6 in d 
Op. 65, Biggs, organ 
'Columbia CMS 6087 (15) 
Cage: Sonatas and Interludes 
for Prepared Piano ( 1 946-8 ) 
Maro Ajemian, prepared piano 
CRI 199 (68) 
The last work (John Cage) was 
composed expressly for perform- 
ance by Maro Ajemian. The disc 
is a reissue of the 1951 two-re- 
cord set by Dial. Cage, upon 
hearing the first playback of the 
master discs, exclaimed that the 
engineer had recorded perfume. 
Indeed, listening to this work is 
an astonishing experience. 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

JUNG'S CONTRIBUTION TO 
THE IDEA OF INDIVIDUAL 
ROOTS OF WORLD SOCIAL 
NEEDS II 

Diana Lusk discusses Jung's arch- 
etype of wholeness in relation to 
the dilemma of modern man, 
fragmentation. Her speech was 
part of a panel discussion spon- 
sored by the Guild for Psycho- 
logical Studies in San Francisco. 



34 



11:45 

CONTEMPORARY MUSIC OF 

POLISH YOUTH 

Marek Grechuta and his Anawa 
ensemble. Presented by Wanda 
Tomczykowska of the Polish 
Arts and Culture Foundation. 

12:45 

THE JEW IN POLISH 

LITERATURE 

Produced at the University of 
Chicago and made available to us 
by the Polish Arts and Culture 
Foundation of San Francisco, 
this is a series on the Jewish con- 
tribution to Polish literature. The 
reader is Mrs. Maria Kuncewicz. 
1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Ibert: Divertissement 

Ormandy, Philadelphia Orch. 
'Columbia CMS 6449 (16) 

I m brie: Legend for Orchestra 
Jorda, San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra 
CRI 152 (14) 

Schoenberg: Canon for String 
Quartet, Wade and Sushel, 
violins; Figelski, viola; 
Sargeant, cello 
Columbia ML 5099 (1) 

Schoenberg: Chamber Sym- 
phony No. 2, Op. 38 
Prausnitz, New Philharmonia 
Orchestra 

*Angel S 36480 (21) 
Rochberg: Symphony No. 2 
(1855-6), Torkanowsky, 
New York Philharmonic 
'Columbia CMS 6379 (30) 

Webern: 5 Pieces for Orchestra, 
Op. 10, Prausnitz, New 
Philharmonic Orchestra 
'Angel S 36480 (5) 

Schoenberg: 77?e New Classicism 
(Cantata), Op. 28, No. 3 
(1926), Robinson, tenor; 
Scharbach, bass; Figelski, 
viola; Arkatov, cello; 
Stein, piano; mixed chorus 
Columbia ML 5099 (9) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

* * 

* * 

* 5:00 RESTAURANT 1 

* REVIEW * 

* Michael & Carol Barclay* 

*5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

* EVENTS 

* 5:30 CAVEAT EMPTOR * 

*6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Cy Schoenf ield , 

*6:30 KPFA NEWS * 

* * 

* * 

* * 
WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



rRa 



7:00 ODE TO GRAVITY 

With Charles Amirkhanian 
Internationally renowned pian- 
ist Maro Ajemian, her husband 
Lionel Galstaun, and KPFA's 
Richard Friedman and Charles 
Amirkhanian discuss the music 
of Komitas (1869-1935), an Ar- 
menian composer, performer and 
musicologist, whose composi- 
tions are based on folk tunes of 
Armenia and set in the modes, 
rhythms, and harmonies of East- 
ern rather than Western (e.g. 
Khachaturian) composition. 
Examples of piano works and 
choral works are heard from a 
privately issued two-record al- 
bum. Don't miss this program. 

•EAR*RAID'EA 




10:30 

WILLIAM KUNTSLER AND 
RICHARD G.SCHULTZ 

A debate between the main de- 
fense attorney and the assistant 
prosecutor in the Chicago Con- 
spiracy trial. Originally broadcast 
in Chicago, this program comes 
to KPFA by way of WABI in 
New York. 

12:00 
CLASSICAL MUSIC 

KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



THURSDAY 



22 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

7:30 

METAPHYSICAL TOBACCO 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

With Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Cy Schoenfield. 
8:45 
MORNING CONCERT 

Brahms: Clarinet Quintet, 

Op. 115, Michaels, clarinet; 

Endres Quartet 

*Vox SVBX 578 (40) 
Schubert: Quartet for Strings 

No. 8 in B-flat, D. 112 

Endres Quartet 

*Vox SVBX 5004 (28) 
Brahms: Clarinet Trio in a. 

Op. 114, D. Glazer, clarinet; 

F. Glazer, piano; Soyer, 

cello 

*Vox SVBX 578 (26) 
Leland Smith: String Trio 

(1953), Rubin, violin; 

James, viola; Hampton, 

cello 

Fantasy 5010 (13) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

THE RECORDED ART OF 

FYODOR SHALYAPIN (9) 

The great Russian bass sings Rus- 
ian arias by Rimsky-Korsakov, 
Musorgsky, Borodin, Rakhman- 
inov, and Glinka. Prepared and 
presented, by Larry Jackson. 
11:45 

NEW TRENDS IN 
ART COLLECTING 
Art fairs, small museums, and 
other innovative art exhibitions 
are bringing artists and art collec- 
tors together in fruitful new 
ways, say illustrator and painter 
George McVicker, ceramicist 
Ruth Duckworth, visiting pro- 
fessor of art at the U. of Chicago, 
and a trustee of the Bergman 
Gallery at the U. of Chicago. Mo- 
derator is Ken Pierce, lecturer in 
humanities at the U. of Chicago. 
(CONVERSATIONS AT 
CHICAGO) 



12:15 

THE DOMESTIC IMPACT 

OF THE WAR 

A speech by/Martin Luther King, 
Jr., delivered to the National La- 
bor Leadership Assembly for 
Peace at the U. of Chicago. This 
program is one of a series called 
Martin Luther King Speaks, pro- 
duced by the Southern Christian 
Leadership Conference. 

12:45 

THE JEW IN POLISH 
LITERATURE: THE 
CHANGING IMAGE 

Produced at the University of 
Chicago and made available to us 
by the Polish Arts and Culture 
Foundation of San Francisco, 
this is a series on the Jewish con- 
tribution to Polish literature. The 
reader is Mrs. Maria Kuncewicz. 

1:45 

MALCOLM X - 
A DISCUSSION 

An informal talk about the life 
and achievements of Malcolm X. 
with James Shabazz, John 
Charles, and Joanne Grant. 
KPFA Archives) 

3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 

WHAT'S HAPPENING»WHAT'§ 

5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

EVENTS * 

5:30 MUSIC REVIEW • 

Charles Amirkhanian * 

6:00 COMMENTARY * 

Sidney Roger * 

6:15 RADIO ALCATRAZ * 

* 

WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



6:30 KPFA News 



7:00 

MUSIC IN AMERICA 

With Chris Strachwitz 

•EAR*RA1D*EA 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 

9:00 

LIVE MUSIC FROM 

ALI AKBAR COLLEGE 

A concert of duets! First we 
hear Ali Akbar Khan (sarod) 
and Indranil Bhattacharya (si- 
tar) performing with Shankar 
Ghosh (tabla). Then two vocal- 
ists, Shrimati Sanjukta Ghosh 
and Shrimate Shikha Bhattachar- 
ya, combine forces to the accom- 
paniment of Shankar Ghosh. 

11:00 

UNDERGROUND: AN 
INTERVIEW WITH, AND 
POETRY BY, REV. DANIEL 
BERRIGAN.S.J. 
Rev. Berrigan was sentenced to 
three years in prison on April 9, 
1970, for his part in the destruc- 
tion of selective service records 
in Catonsville, Maryland, in 1968. 
He "went underground" before 
he was taken to prison but was 
apprehended by agents of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
on August 11, 1970. The inter- 
view with Father Berrigan was 
recorded while he was still "un- 
derground", and it begins with 
him talking about his brother. 
Rev. Phillip Berrigan, who is al- 
so in federal prison in connection 
with the Catonsville action. The 
program concludes with a record- 
ing of Daniel Berrigan reading 
some of his own poetry, at a 
gathering shortly before his ar- 
rest in August. 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

With Jeff Echeverria 



35 



FRIDAY 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



7:30 

FRIDAY MORNING 94.1 

With Denny Smithson. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Sidney Roger. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

J.C. Bach: Symphony in E for 
Double Orchestra, Op. 18 
No. 5, Hurwitz, English 
Chamber Orchestra 
*London STS 15013 (15) 

Dvorak: Requiem Mass 
Lorengar; Komlossy; 
llosfalvy; Krause; Kertesz, 
London Symphony Orch. 
*London OSA 1281 (94) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

JUNG'S CONTRIBUTION TO 

THE IDEA OF INDIVIDUAL 

ROOTS OF WORLD 

SOCIAL NEEDS - III 

A speech by Strephon Williams 

on the mystique of the collective 

unconscious in the new age.given 

by the Guild for Psychological. 

Studies in San Francisco . 



23 



11:45 

DUTCH CONCERT HALL 

Hendrik Andriessen: Variations 
and Fugue for Strings on a 
theme by Johann Kuhnau 
Nicolai Rimski Korsakov: 

Sheherazade, Op. 35 
Roberto Benzi, Radio Philhar- 
monic Orchestra of Radio Neth- 
erland. STEREO 

12:45 

THE JEW IN POLISH 
LITERATURE: BACKGROUND 
IN HISTORY AND LEGEND 
Produced at the University of 
Chicago and made available to us 
by the Polish Arts and Culture 
Foundation of San Francisco, 
this is a series on the Jewish con- 
tribution to Polish literature. The 
reader is Mrs. Maria Kuncewicz. 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Bach : English Suite No. 6 in d 

Backhaus, piano 

* London STS 15065 (23) 
Copland: Sonata for Piano 

(1941 ), Hilde Somer, piano 

CRI 171 (23) 
Milhaud: Les Choephores 

Zorina, narrator; Boatwright; 

Jordan; Bernstein, New York 

Philharminic 

'Columbia CMS 6396 (35) 
Reynolds: Quick are the Mouths 

of Earth (1965), Weisberg, 

Contemporary Chamber 

Ensemble 

'Nonesuch H 71219 (20) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



* 5:00 BRITISH PRESS 

* REVIEW 

* 5:15 CALENDAR OF 

* EVENTS 

« 5:30 CONSUMER 

* PROTECTION 

I 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Robert Tideman 

* 6:30 KPFA News 
* 
WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 




20,000 



7:00 

STRANGE LANDS & 

FRIENDLY PEOPLE 

A program on African music 
with Sam Oni. 

•EAR'RAIO'EA 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 

9:00 

ON STAGE 

THE KNIGHTS OF THE 
ROUND TABLE 
By Jean Cocteau 

With an introduction by Jean 
Cocteau himself, this perform- 
ance was taped for French radio 
at the Drama Festival in Milly 
in 1967. Performed in French. 
(KPFA Archives) 

12:00 

THE REPORTERS 

Produced by LeVandis Butler. 



KPFAs 

CO-OP NUMBER 



36 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



SATURDAY 



24 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 
8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Robert Tideman. 
8:45 

REVIEW OF THE 
BRITISH WEEKLIES 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

McPhee: Tabuh-Tabuhan (Toc- 
cata for Orchestra, 1936) 
Hanson, Eastman-Rochester 

Orchestra 

*MercurySR 90103 (17) 
Bartok : Sonata for 2 Pianos 

and Percussion, Masselos 
and Ajemian, pianos; Mar- 
cus and Goodman, persussion 
Dial 1 (25) 

Raaij makers: Contrasts 
electronic music 
*Limelight LS 86055 (6) 

Hindemith: Sonata No. 2 for 
Organ (1937) 
Biggs, organ 
'Columbia CMS 6234 (10) 

Britten: Matinees Musicales 
Zeller, Vienna State Opera 
Orchestra 
*Music Guild MS 834 (16) 

Liszt: Missa Choral is, for mixed 
chorus and organ (1865) 
Margittan, organ; Forrai, 
Budapest Chorus 
*Qualiton LPX 1141 (34) 

The first work is based on Balin- 
ese themes, harmonies and tim- 
bres. Extraordinary music by an 
American who lived on Bali in 
the 30's. The Bartok performance 
is quite marvelous— the 1951 vin- 
tage recordings has fine sonics; 
this is a very rare record, long 
out-of -'print. 

11:00 

CHILDREN'S BOOK 

SAMPLER 

Ellyn Beatty 

11:30 

P'ALANTE 

12:00 

IAIN BAXTER , 

INTERMEDIA ARTIST 

On August 8, Charles Amirk- 

hanian visited with intermedia 

artist lain Baxter in his North 

Vancouver, British Columbia 

home. This residence doubles as 



the headquarters for an unusual 
corporation called the N.E. 
Thing Co,, Ltd. Mr. Amirkhan- 
ian probes the motivations for 
setting up such an institution 
and discusses projects of the 
company with Mr. Baxter, who 
prefers to be introduced as 
"president" of N.E. Thing Co. 

12:30 
BOOKS 

Kenneth Rexroth 

1:00 

A CONVERSATION 

WITH EUBIE BLAKE 

Neal Conan and Ian Whitcomb 
visit with Mr. Blake, composer 
of I'm Just Wild About Harry, 
and the famed Along. Eubie is 
one of the fathers of ragtime pi- 
ano, and, at age 86, still plays 
with the best. On this program 
Eubie reminisces about his 
youth in Baltimore, the early 
days of ragtime, and his career 
in vaudeville and the theatre. 

3:00 

IN EXILE 

A short story by Anton Chek- 
hov. The reader is Bobbie. 
Harms. 
3:30 

THIN AIR 
4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES 
WITH ANTHONY BOUCHER 
Obituaries from 1964 
Koloman von Pataky, tenor 
(Archives of 1964) 
5:00 

PERIOD COSTUME 
AS ACTOR 

Lucy Barton, author of Historic 
Costume for the Stage and well 
known authority on costume de- 
sign, tells how costume, the per- 
iod, the actor, the actor's walk 
and gesture are an integral part 
of dramatic performance. The 
intense vitality and wit of this 
theatre lady enliven her broadly 
informed discussion. First pre- 
sented to a theatre class at the 
University of Texas. 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY I 

* Steve Murdock * 



7:30 

THE U.N.: CONTROLLING 

CONFLICTS IN THE 70's 

A panel discussion sponsored by 
the United Nations Association 
and the World Affairs Council of 
San Francisco. Participating in 
the panel were William Coblentz, 
San Francisco Attorney, Urban 
Whitaker, Professor at San Fran- 
cisco State College, and Ed Rad- 
enzell.KOED commentator. Fred 
Firth, President of the United 
Nations Association, moderated 
the discussion. 
8:45 

SOUND POEMS 
OF TOBY LURIE 
The Santa Barbara poet is intro- 
duced by Charles Amirkhanian. 
Lurie presents several types of 
performance poems which he 
has developed— solo; conversa- 
tional; one-work group partici- 
pation poems, and others. Lur- 
ie's work strongly emphasizes a 
child-like, rhythmic treatment 
of his texts. Many of his poems 
contain intricate rhythmic nota- 
tions for performance (he is a 
former Darius Milhaud student). 
Don't miss Elsa Knight Thomp- 
son's baritone solo in the work 
entitled Revolution. STEREO 
9:30 

SAN FRANCISCO WOMEN'S 
LIBERATION MEDIA 
PROJECT, PROGRAM II 
The second program, another 
mix of words and music, pro- 
duced by Women's Liberation, 
to further their struggle against 
oppression. STEREO 

10:15 

THE CRACKUP 

Scott Fitzgerald's moving auto- 
biographical account of his pri- 
vate sense of breakdown, read 
by Peter Savage, with introduc- 
tion and continuity by Eleanor 
Sully. 
11:00 

INTERVIEWS WITH THE 
SOLEDAD BROTHERS 
This program is self-contained. 
It consists of interviews conduct- 
ed by David Stevens of KPFK 
with John Cluchette, Fleeta 
Drumgo, and George Jackson. 



* 

* 6:30 KPFA News 


* 

* 12:00 


7:00 

SOUNDS OUR FATHERS 

HEARD 

Songs of the Civil War. 


AFTERMATH 

All night jazz with Bert Thomas. 

37 



SUNDAY 

8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news 



8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Galuppi : Concerto No. 5 in 

E-flat 

Biffoli Quartet 

Dover HCR 5222 (8) 
Messiaen: Vingt Regards Sur 

L 'Enfant Jesus 

Ogdon, piano 

*ArgoZRG 650/1 (129) 

11:00 

JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 

THE WAYLESS WAY: 
A MEDITATION BEING 
With JACK GARISS 



2:00 

THE LONG RUSSIAN WINTER 

BORIS GODUNOV 
By Modest Musorgsky 

Soris Godunov: Ivan Petrov 
Pimen: Mark Reshetin 
False DmitrkVladimir Ivanovsky 
Marina Mneshek:lrina Arkhipova 
Prince Shuisky: Giorgi Shulpin 
Varlaam: Aleksei Geleva 
Simpleton: Anton Grigoriev 
Chorus and Orchestra of the 
Bolshoi Theatre, Aleksandr Me- 
likh-Pashayev. 
Melodiya D-010953/60 
Produced for Pacifica West by 
Kathy Dobkin andLarry Jackson. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



* 5:30 VIEWS & REVIEWS 

* Eleanor Sully 

* 



6:30 KPFA News 



25 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 

SOUNDS OUR FATHERS 

HEARD 

"Songs about Prohibition" 

Produced by Byron Bryant. 
(KPFA Archives) 

7:30 

OPERA REVIEW 

KPFA critics Bill Collins, Carol 
Barclay, and guest reviewers dis- 
cuss recent 1970 San Francisco 
Opera productions. 

8:15 

JOHN WHITE, L.A. 

EVENTS ARTIST 

Mr. White visited with Charles 
Amirkhanian last July, and des- 
cribed a series of conceptual e- 
vents which he, in conjunction 
with Aviva Stevens, has been do- 
ing in the Bay Area this Septem- 
ber and October. This program 
provides an introduction to an 
active and interesting personality 
of the Southern California avant- 
garde. 




Score for audience participation event 
by John White 



8:35 

THE DEMOCRATIC FRONT 

Beverly Axelrod talks with two 
Arab students who are members 
of the Democratic Front for the 
Liberation of Palestine. The 
interview took place earlier this 
year (1970) in Paris. 

9:00 

LIKE ROLLING STONES: 
YOUNG PEOPLE IN 
BERKELEY, SUMMER 1970 

A special program produced by 
Bill Northwood and Claude 
Marks of KPFA, with a little 
help from their friends. 



10:00 

ANY FRESH LAUNDRY? 

This evening we will listen to a 
tape of the Staples Singers in 
concert from several years ago. 
An extraordinary performance. 



38 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



MONDAY 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 



26 



7:30 

WEEKLY MONDAY 

Charles Shere. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of Saturday's com- 
mentary by Steve Murdock. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Barber: Quartet for Strings 

Op. 1 1 ; Beaux-Arts Quartet 

Epic LC 3907 (15) 
Hindemith: Octet (1957-8) 

Fine Arts Quartet members; 

New York Woodwind 

Quintet 

*Concert-Disc CS 218 (26) 
M. Haydn: Divertimento in D 

Vienna Wind Quintet 

'Music Guild MS 110 (14) 
Wilder: Quintet No. 6 for Wood- 
winds; New York Woodwind 

Quintet 

'Concert-Disc CS 223 (12) 
Wolpe: Passacaglia for Piano 

Tudor, piano 

'Counterpoint 530 (12) 
Milhaud: Concerto for Cello and 

Orchestra No. 1 (1934) 

Starker, cello; Susskind, 

Philharmonia Orchestra 

Angel 35418 (16) 
Hovhaness: The Holy City 

Lipkin, Royal Philharmonic 

Orchestra 

*CRI SD 259 (9) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

REVOLUTION FOR 
BREAKFAST 

—a program about the Black Pan- 
thers and Young Lords feeding 
programs for children. 

11:45 

REFLECTIONS ON THE LIFE 

OF BERTRAND RUSSELL 

Donald Herring, assistant profes- 
sor of English and Humanities at 
the University of Chicago, joins 
Alan Donagan, professor in the 

KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



department of philosophy, and 
David Schwalm,graduate student 
in the department of English for 
a discussion of the last 25 years 
of Bertrand Russell's life. The 
philosopher's increasing concern 
with international relations and 
with the possibility of a nuclear 
holocaust is examined through 
the letters and documents which 
appear in the third volume of 
his autobiography. 
12:15 

ERICSALZMAN 
WBAI's music director is inter- 
viewed at WBAI by KPFK's Varda 
Ullman. The discussion includes 
Eric's 1969 Latin American tour. 
The Nude Paper Sermon, re- 
leased in December 1969, by 
Nonesuch records and named 
one of the 10 best records of the 
year by both Newsweek and Bill- 
board, and other activities. 
1:00 
BOOKS 

With Kenneth Rexroth. 
Rebroadcast of Saturday's pro- 
gram. 

1:30 

THE SECOND TREE FROM 

THE CORNER 

A sketch by E.B. White entitled 
77?e Second Tree From The 
Corner, from his book of the 
same name. The reader is Eleanor 
Sully. 
1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last Friday's pro- 
gram. 
3:00 
AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Bach: Organ Sonata No. 5 in C 

Alain, organ 

Musical Heritage Society 551 

(14) 
Thomson: Variations on Sunday 

School Tunes 

Mason, organ 

'Counterpoint 5522 (20) 
Brahms: Haydn Variations 

Furtwangler, Berlin 

Philharmonic 

'Everest 3252 (19) 
Hindemith: Symphony in E-flat 

Boult, London Philharmonic 

"Everest 3008 (30) 
Martinu: Concerto for 2 String 

Orchestras, Piano and Timpani 

Sejna, Czech Philharmonic 

Artia ALP 135 (23) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 



* 
* 


5:00 ON FILM 
Bob Sitton 


* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


5:15 CALENDAR OF 
EVENTS 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


5:30 CONFERENCE 
WASHINGTON 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


6:00 COMMENTARY 
Mike Culbert 


* 
* 


* 
* 


6:30 KPFA News 


* 
* 


* 


7:00 SOVIET PRESS & 
PERIODICALS 
Willta-i Mandel 


* 



EAR RAID 

7:15 OPERA PREVIEW 

Bill Collins presents the first of 
two programs previewing Otello. 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Timely public affairs coverage. 

9:00 

KPFA WORLD EAR PROJECT: 

TRANSMISSION THREE 

A world-wide audience participa- 
tion project of this station con- 
tinues as Charles Amirkhanian 
and Richard Friedman host an- 
other program of ambient sound 
recordings. For details on how 
you can work on the Project, 
tune in tonight. 

10:00 

WRITERS AND WRITING 

Bay Area novelists, writers and 
poets talk about their writing 
^and read passages from newly 
published work or work in pro- 
gress. 



11:00 

♦INFORMATION 

TRANSMISSION 

MODULATION AND 

NOISE 

Richard Friedman. 



39 



TUESDAY 



27 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

,7:30 
IN THE MORNING 

Paul Fagan. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Bob Fitch. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Bloch: Sacred Service (Avodath 
Hakodesh), Merrill, cantor; 
Bernstein, NY Philharmonic 
Columbia ML 5621 (52) 

Brahms: 10 In termezzi 
Gould, piano 
Columbia ML 5637 (42) 

Mendelssohn: Rondo Capriccioso 
in e, Davis, piano 
Columbia ML 5806 (7) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

SOVIET PRESS 

& PERIODICALS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram with William Mandel. 

11:45 

PETER POLLACK ON 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Peter Pollack, historian of photo- 
graphy, talks with Bob Sitton. 
Pollack recently gave a lecture at 
the University of California under 
the aegis of the U.S. Art Museum. 
The subject of his lecture is From 
the Photograph Through the 
Photo gram. 



12:15 

AMERICANIZING THE 
INDIAN 

From pre-Colonial New England 
to the Western states after the 
Civil War, re-white relations fol- 
lowed the same cruel pattern: 
the removal of the Indian tribes 
from desirable lands, either by 
warfare or by civilization. By the 
time the federal government est- 
ablished tribal reservations, the 
tribes had already lost their in- 
dependence and their way of 
life, says Ralph Lerner, associate 

professor social science at the 

University of Chicago. 

1:15 

RUSSIAN FOLK MUSIC 

Larry Jackson presents another 
programme in his popular series, 
Russian Folk Music. In this pre- 
sentation will be heard perform- 
ances by Boris Shtolkolov, Ivan 
Petrov, The Don Cossacks, and 
others. STEREO 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

3:00 

CONCERT OF NEW RELEASES 



WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

* 


* 
* 


5:00 GERMAN PRESS * 


* 


REVIEW I 


* 


Helga Lohr-Bailey * 


* 


5:15 CALENDAR OF I 


* 


EVENTS * 


* 


5:30 DRAMA & *» 


* 


LITERATURE * 


* 


REVIEW * 


* 


Eleanor Sully , 



I 6:00 COMMENTARY * 

* Bob Fitch „ 

* 6:30 KPFA News * 

* * 
WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 
7:30 FILM REVIEW 
Margo Skinner 

•EARMIAID'EA 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Documentaries, discussions and 
special reports. 

9:00 

BENNETT TARSHISH 

PRESENTS 

Arnold Bax — IV 

Piano Sonata No. 4 

(Loveridge, piano) 
Garden of Fand (Beecham, 

Royal Philharmonic) 
Cello Sonata (Hooton, cello; 

Parry, piano) 
A rebroadcast of a popular Tar- 
shish program on the famed Brit- 
ish composer. Sir Arnold Bax. 

10:30 

IN THE NAME OF PEACE: 
AMERICAN MILITARY 
TECHNOLOGY AND 
WAR CRIMES 

Speech by Dr. Kurt Steiner at 
Hiroshima Day observances in 
Palo Alto, California, and a ques- 
tion and answer session that fol- 
lowed the speech. 

11:30 

FROM BEHIND THE WALLS 

From Behind the Walls is a story 
written by a young girl who was 
committed to a mental institu- 
tion for three years. She was six- 
teen when she wrote the story, 
subsequently published in Gno- 
sis, a trannual of poetry and 
short fiction. The reader is Sha- 
ron Yelvington. 

12:00 

*INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

DeLeon Harrison. 



40 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



WEDNESDAY 



28 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

With Jim Emdy. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Bob Fitch. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER 
MUSIC SOCIETY RECITAL 
An all-French program directed 
by Jean-Louis LeRoux. Due to 
an exhorbitant and unfair in- 
crease in the expense of live 
broadcasts of concerts (Thank 
you, Bell Telephone, LOADS), 
KPFA will be bringing you taped, 
delayed transmissions of this 
year's San Francisco Chamber 
Music Society subscription con- 
certs. This program recorded last 
Monday night, October 26th, at 
the Fireman Fund's Theatre, San 

the Fireman's Fund Theatre, San 
Francisco. Recorded by George 
Craig and hosted by Larry Jack- 
son. 

Couperin: Concert Royal No. 3 
for Violin, Cello and Harpsi- 
chord 
Messiaen: Quartet for Piano, 
Violin, Clarinet and Cello 
Duparc: Three 

Duparc: Three Melodies 
Milhaud: Six Chansons Hebrai- 
ques 

Nathan Rubin, violin; Donald 
O'Brien, clarinet; Andor Toth, 
Jr., cello; Marta Bracchi Le 
Roux, piano; Claudine Carlson, 
mezzo-soprano 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



11:15 

CRIME CONTROL AND 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Our over-burdened police and 
courts have time to deal with 
real crimes such as murder and 
theft if such moral offenses as 
drunkenness, gambling and pros- 
titution were dropped from the 
criminal code completely. This 
is the view of Norval 
is the view of Norval Morris, 
professor of Law, Director of the 
Center for Studies in Criminal 
Justice, and co-author of The 
Honest Politician's Guide to 
Crime Control. Morris Philipson, 
director of the University of Chi- 
cago Press, interviews Mr. Morris. 
(Conversations at Chicago.) 

11:45 

CONVERSATION 
AT CHICAGO 

"E. Power Biggs and His Music" 

12:15 

THE BET; and 

WITHOUT A TITLE 

Two short stories by Anton 
Chekhov. The reader is Bobbie 
Harms. 

12:45 

SEND NOT TO ASK 

FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS 

A speech by the Southern Chris- 
tion Leadership Conference's 
president, the Reverend Ralph 
David Abernathy, delivered to a 
Soul Rally for the Howard Uni- 
versity Mississippi Project. One 
of a series from SCLC called 
Martin Luther King Speaks. 

1:15 

WHATEVER BECAME OF ... 

ROCHELLE HUDSON? 

The star whose screen efforts 
were nearly eclipsed by the fame 
she gathered when at the height 
of her career she told a reporter 
that her home town stunk. Rich- 
ard Lamparski travelled to Palm 
Desert, California to seek some 
outrageous statements. 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 



3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Shostakovich: Symphony No. 6, 

Op. 54 (1939) 

Boult, London Philharmonic 

Orchestra 

* Everest 3007 (33) 
Mahler: Symphony No. 5 in 

c-sharp, (1903) Walter, 

NY Philharmonic 

Columbia SL 171 (67) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING»WHAT'S 

* 5:00 RESTAURANT I 
J REVIEW 

* Michael & Carol Barclay* 

CALENDAR OF I 



I 5:15 

* 5:30 

* 6:00 

* 6:30 

* 



EVENTS * 

MILITARY MONITOR* 
COMMENTARY * 

Sylvia M. Siegel * 

* 

KPFA News * 



* 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

7:00 ODE TO GRAVITY 

With Charles Amirkhanian 
Jen la domo de Gesinjoroj Harri- 
son. Tiu estas muzikejo. Tiu es- 
tas banejo. Tiu estas AGARI KO! 




11:00 

McCLOSKY'S GOT A BRAN' 

NEW BAG 



12:00 
*SOURCE 

Produced by Larry Austin, Stan 
Lunetta and Arthur Woodbury, 
editors of the avant-garde music 
periodical. Source. 

41 



THURSDAY 



29 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 

7:30 

METAPHYSICAL TOBACCO 

IN THE MORNING MIX 

Jim Emdy 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Sylvia M. Siegel. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Berg: Concerto for Violin and 

Orchestra 

Stern, violin; Bernstein, 

NY Philharmonic 

Columbia ML 5773 (26) 
Hindemith: Sonata No. 3 for 

Piano (1936) Previn, piano 

Columbia ML 5639 (17) 
Nixon: Wine of Asthonishment; 

Sacco; Behold the Fowls of 

the Air. 
Ward: Listen, Lord 

Tegnell, San Francisco State 

College A Cappella Choir 

Music Library 6997 (19) 
Barber: Four Excursions; 
Martin: Prelude No. 7 

Previn, piano 

Columbia ML 5639 (19) 
Brahms: Quintet No. 2 for 

Strings, Amadeus Quartet; 

Aronowitz, 2nd viola 
*DGG 139 430 (25) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

John Bovingdon reads Q-acula 
by Bram Stoker. 

11:15 

LULLABY OF DEATH 

A cross-country survey of the es- 
calating problem of heroin addic- 
tion among young persons. 



11:45 

HELENA MODRZEJEWSKA 

A program commemorating the 
130th anniversary of this Polish 
actress who resided for many 
years in California. Produced and 
read by Mrs. Krystyna Kamarow- 
ska McKenna. This program 
comes to KPFA courtesy of 
Wanda Tomczykowska of the 
Polish Arts and Culture Founda- 
tion. 

12:15 

MUSIC OF THE 

AMERICAN INDIANS 

Sioux Fast War Dance Songs re- 
corded at Pine Ridge, South Da- 
kota. The musicians are The 
Sioux Travelers-Cleveland High- 
bull, Delores Highbull, Leroy 
Brings Plenty, and Leroy Red- 
dest. Indian Records IR 1193. 

1:00 

IF SUICIDE ISA FELONY' 

WHAT ABOUT SMOG? 

How can we turn growing public 
awareness of environmental 
threats into effective political 
policy? Experts from the aca- 
demic, scientific, and political 
communities meeting at the Cen- 
ter for the Study of Democratic 
Institutions in Santa Barbara dis- 
cuss legal and educational strate- 
gies. Analogy is drawn to the 
difficulty of achieving change in 
the area of civil rights. 

1:45 

MALCOLM X - 

A RETROSPECTIVE 

A documentary record of the in- 
fluence of Malcolm X on the 
black liberation movement be- 
tween 1960 and 1965, produced 
by Chris Koch from tapes re- 
corded during those years. 
(KPFA Archives) 

3:00 

CONCERT OF OPERATIC 

RELEASES 

With Michael Barclay. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 
I 5:00 JAPANESE PRESS 

* REVIEW 

t 5:15 CALENDAR OF 

* EVENTS 

* 5:30 MUSIC REVIEW 

* Charles Amirkhanian 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY 

* Robert Pickus 

* 6:15 RADIO ALCATRAZ 

« 6:30 KPFA News 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



arRaidtar 

7:00 VARIOUS FOLK 

With Larry Bartlett 
The final program of a three-part 
series of Woody Guthrie's Lib- 
rary of Congress recordings. 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

FREE MUSIC STORE 

Igor Kipnis, harpsichord. In this 
stereo concert recorded by our 
New York station, WBAI, we 
hear works by Kuhnau, Haydn, 
Bach, Christopher, Rorem, Scar- 
latti and Rameau. 

11:00 

A DEBATE ON PG&E's 
PROPOSED NUCLEAR POWER 
PLANT IN SANTA CRUZ 
COUNTY 

Portions of a debate between Dr. 
John Gofman, Professor of Medi- 
cal Physics at U.C. Berkeley, and 
Mr. Alexander Grendon, official 
representative of the Atomic En- 
ergy Commission. The discussion 
was conducted at a PUBLIC 
FORUM ON RADIATION spon- 
sored by the Santa Cruz County 
Board of Supervisors on June 23, 
1970. It was attended by about 
500 citizens. 



42 



12:00 
AFTERMATH 

With Jeff Echeverria 



FRIDAY 

7:00 
KPFANEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news- 



7:30 

FRIDAY MORNING 94.1 

With Denny Smithson. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Robert Pickus. 
8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 
Mozart: Andante with Five 
Variations for Piano Duet 
in G, K. 501 , Be*ger and 
Neumeyer, Mozart piano 
Archive 19534 (10) 
Schubert: Rosamunde (Incidental 
Music, Op. 26); Overture 
"The Magic Harp"; Serenade, 
Op. 135; Psalm 23, Op. 132 
Eustrati, alto; Berlin Motet 
Choir; Raucheisen, piano; 
Lehmann, Berlin Philharmonic 
Decca DXB 144 (90) 
The Schubert selections are on a 
rare and out-of-print two record 
Decca album. 
10:45 

MORNING READING 
John Bovingdon reads Dracula 
by Bram Stoker. 
11:15 

HEALTH CARE — 
PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS 
Wilbur Cohen, Dean of the School 
of Education at the U. of Michi- 
gan, and former Secretary of 
Health, Education and Welfare; 
Dr. Robert Daniels, Associate 
Dean of the Division of Physical 
Sciences and Associate Professor 
of Psychiatry in the Pritzker 
School of Medicine at the U. of 
Chicago; and Odin Anderson, 
professor in the Graduate School 
of Business and the Department 
of Sociology, and Associate Dir- 
ector of the Center for Health 
Administration Studies . 

11:45 

AN INTERVIEW WITH- 

DR. MARGARET MEAD 

Dr. Mead discusses youth, love, 
conflict and other universals; as 
well as her latest book: Culture 
and Commitment. The inter- 
viewer is Gil Jardine. 



30 



12:15 

TOWARDS AN ORDERED 

SOCIETY WITH JUSTICE 

An address made by the South- 
ern Christian Leadership Confer- 
ence's president, the Rev. Ralph 
Abernathy at the Women's As- 
sembly of the United Methodist 
Church in Houston, Texas on 
April 14, 1970. He spoke on the 
social myths in present-day so- 
ciety, to which Robert Lamb, 
Community Relations Specialist 
for the Department of Justice, 
responded. 

(MARTIN LUTHER KING 
SPEAKS) 
12:45 

POLITICS AND THE ARTS 
Where politicians fear or refuse 
to tread, artists must rush in to 
nourish the principles of freedom 
and human understanding. This 
theme is explored by the noted 
actor, director and writer Peter 
Ustinov in an article published 
in 1966 in the Atlantic Monthly. 

1:15 

MORMON AUDITORIUM 

ORGAN, INDEPENDENCE, 

MISSOURI 

Myron Roberts: Prelude and 

Trumpetings 
Buxtehude: How Brightly shines 

the Morning Star Jesus Christ, 

Our Savior 
Samuel .Barber: Wondrous Love 
John Obetz, organist at the Aud- 
itorium of the World Headquar- 
ters of the Reorganized Church 
of Jesus Christ of Lat.ci Day 
Saints in Independence, Missouri, 
performs. STEREO 

1:45 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's pro- 
gram. 
3:00 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 
Gibbons: Anthems, Madrigals 
and Fan tasies 
Deller Consort 
Archive ARC 3053 (44) 
Ives: Second Pianoforte Sonata, 
"Concord, Mass. 1840- 1860" 
Kontarsky, piano; Plumacher, 
viola; Schwegler, flute 
*Mainstream MS 5013 (36) 
Schoenberg: Variations for 
Orchestra, Op. 31 
Mehta, Los Angeles Philhar- 
monic 
'London CS6612 (22) 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

* 5:00 BRITISH PRESS * 

* REVIEW * 

5:15 CALENDAR OF * 

EVENTS * 

5:30 ECOLOGY & * 

POLITICS , 

Keith Murray * 

* 5:45 REPORT TO THE * 

* LISTENER * 

* Al Silbowitz * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY * 

* Bruce Franklin * 

* 6:30 KPFANEWS * 
WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 



7:00 

JURA PARIS ROAD 

With Charles Shere. 

9:00 

ON STAGE 

TO END GOD'S JUDGEMENT 
By Antonin Artaud 

A poetic production of Artaud's 
play by the former Actor's 
Workshop of San Francisco made 
for KPFA in 1965, but because 
of the controversial nature of 
the play not broadcast until 
1968. As introduction to the 
performance of the play, we are 
broadcasting a panel discussion 
taped in 1952 and broadcast in 
place of the drama itself, which 
includes Mark Lilienthal, Ken 
Margolis, Anthony Boucher, Hen- 
ry Elson, Al Partridge and Erik 
Bauersfeld. 
(KPFA Archives) 
11:00 

RECENT COMPOSITIONS BY 
THE YOUNG SOVIET COM- 
POSER, ALFRED SHNITKE 
Contemporary music as com- 
posed by Alfred Shnitke who 
was born in 1934 in Saratov re- 
gion. Shnitke graduated from 
the Moscow Conservatory in 
1958 and in addition to com- 
posing he is a teacher at Mos- 
cow's Gnesin Institute of Music. 
(Moscow Radio) 
12:00 
AFTERMATH 

Music and sometimes talk. 

43 



SATURDAY 



31 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's news. 

8:30 
COMMENTARY 

Rebroadcast of last night's com- 
mentary by Bruce Franklin. 

8:45 

REVIEW OF THE 

BRITISH WEEKLIES 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Monteverdi: Madrigals 

Lausanne Baroque Ensemble 
*Musical Heritage Society 
953 (25) 

Palestrina: Surge Arnica Mea; 
Messe "Ascendo Ad Patrem"; 
Messe "In Festis Apostolo- 
rum"; Cantantibus Organ is 
Saint-Eustache Chantaurs 
Harmonia Mundi HMO 30.510 
(57) 

Handel: Delia Guerra Amorosa 
(cantata) Loorij; Orchestra of 
Netherlands Handel Society 
Handel Society HDL 19 (11) 

de Morales: Motette Exaltata est 
Sancta Dei Genitrix zu 6 
Stimmen, Monserrat ensemble 
Harmonia Mundi HM 30 621 
(7) 

11:00 

CHILDREN'S BOOK 
SAMPLER 

Ellyn Beatty 

11:30 
P'ALANTE 

12:00 

REMINISCENCES 
OF A REBEL 

Ben Legere 

12:30 
BOOKS 

Kenneth Rexroth 



1:00 

THREE WHO RESIGNED 

A discussion by three former 
members of city commissions on 
the frustrations they encounter- 
ed and their reasons for resign- 
ing. The participants are Audrey 
Rodgers, former chairman of the 
San Francisco Citizen's Charter 
Revision Committee, Victor Hon- 
ig, who served for three years on 
the San Francisco Human Rights 
Commission, and Babette Cham- 
berlain, former President of the 
Berkeley Human Relations and 
Welfare Commission. The mod- 
erator is Al Silbowitz. 

2:00 

VEENA RECITAL 

Featuring Shakunthala Srini va- 
san, recorded by WBAI New 
York. 

2:45 

A PRESS CONFERENCE 

WITH FEDERICO FELLINI 

After a screening of his new film 
The Fellini Satyricon the great 
Italian film director, and the cre- 
ator of such masterpieces as La 
Dolce Vita, La Strad, 8V2. and 
Juliet of the Spirits, answered 
questions from an audience com- 
posed of college students and 
professors. Milton Hoffman is 
the commentator. 

3:30 
THIN AIR 

4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES 

WITH ANTHONY BOUCHER 

Archive program of obituaries 
from 1964. 

5:00 

MUSIC OF THE 

ITALIAN MASTERS 

D. Scarlatti: Sonata, L. 384 
Fernando Valenti, harpsichord 

Albinoni: Sonata a cinque, Op. 2 
No. 6 — I Musici 

Periosi: Transitus animae, orator- 
io, Fiorenza Cossotto, mezzo- 
soprano; Polyphonic Choir of 
Milan; Angelicum Orch; Carlo 
Gillario, conductor. 



WHAT'S HAPPENING'WHAT'S 

* * 

* * 

* 6:00 COMMENTARY * 

* Henry Anderson * 

* » 

* 6:30 KPFA NEWS * 

* * 

WHAT'S HAPPENING*WHAT'S 

7:00 

SOUNDS OUR FATHERS 

HEARD 

Songs about Railroads. 



7:30 

QUADRAPHONIC 

BROADCAST 

Oakland Symphony Orchestra 
concert; works of Charles Amir- 
khanian, John Cage, and Richard 
Friedman. The Cage work is the 
world Premiere Performance — 
1970, Davis, California - of a 
piece titled 33 1/3. Tune one 
stereo radio to KPFA (94) and 
another to KQED-FM (88.5). 



11:00 

AN INTERVIEW 

WITH HOWARD FAST 

Howard Fast, author of Sparta- 
cus and Citizen Tom Paine dis- 
cusses literary repression during 
the McCarthy era, the ecological 
•crisis and his latest book The 
General Zapped an Angel /'Mor- 
row) with Gil Jardine. 

11:30 

THE ANTI-WAR MOVEMENT 

IN VIETNAM 

Chris Pope of the Stanford chap- 
ter of the Committee of Con- 
cerned Asian Scholars, and Bill 
Northwood of KPFA's news de- 
partment talk with two Viet- 
namese students, Ngo Vinh Long 
and Doan Hong Hai, about the 
war and the anti-war movement 
in South Vietnam. 

12:00 
AFTERMATH 

All night jazz with Bert Thomas. 



44 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



COMMENTATORS 



ROBERT PICKUS 

President, World with 
out War Council of 
the United States 


2 

BRUCE FRANKLIN 

From the Central 
Committee of the 
Revolutionary Union 


3 

HENRY ANDERSON 

Free lance social 
analyst and writer 


5 

HENRY RAMSEY 

Richmond attorney 


6 

DAVID BORTIN 

Bay Area attorney 
who generally 
discusses "law and 
order" 


7 

CY SCHOENFIELD 

Director of Student 
Research Facility, 
Berkeley 


8 

HAL & ANNE 

DRAPER 

Active in labor and 
political affairs. 


9 

DICK MEISTER 

Labor writer 


10 

STEVE MURDOCK 

Writer and commen- 
tator on political 
affairs 


12 

MIKE CULBERT 

Executive Editor of 
the Berkeley Gazette 


13 

PETER SHAPIRO 

Member of the Joe 
Hill Caucus of SDS 
atS.F. State 


14 

SYLVIA M. SIEGEL 

Executive Director, 
Association of 
California Consumers 


15 

DENNIS ALLEN 

Peace Education Sec- 
retary of the American 
Friends Service Comm. 
of Northern California 


16 

BRUCE FRANKLIN 

From the Central 
Committee of the 
Revolutionary Union 


17 

FATHER EUGENE 
BOYLE Chairman 
of Commission on 
Social Justice, Arch- 
diocese of S. F. 


19 

TOM HAYDEN 

Political activist and 
one of the founders 
of SDS 


20 

SENATOR NICHOLAS 
PETRIS Democratic 
State Senator from 
the 11th District 


21 

CY SCHOENFIELD 

Director of Student 
Research Facility, 
Berkeley 


22 

SIDNEY ROGER 

Journalist specializing 
in labor affairs 


23 

ROBERT TIDEMAN 

Director, Henry George 
School of Social Science 
in San Francisco 


24 

STEVE MURDOCK 

Writer and commen- 
tator on political 
affairs 


26 

MIKE CULBERT 

Execu five Editor of 
the Berkeley Gazette 


27 

BOB FITCH 

Free lance writer 


28 

SYLVIAM. SIEGEL 

Executive Director, 
Association of 
California Consumers 


29 

ROBERT PICKUS 

President, World with 
out War Council of 
the United States 


30 

BRUCE FRANKLIN 

From the Cen tral 
Committee of the 
Revolutionary Union 


31 

HENRY ANDERSON 

Free lance social 
analyst and writer 





■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAM PRODUCERS 



Jeanette Hermes, attorney who has done research in 
Chinese law. 

John Hopkins, educational assistant for the Consumer's 
Cooperative of Berkeley 

Marve Hyman, chemical engineer and lecturer on pol- 
lution control and computer applications. 

Pierre Idiart, editor of the weekly French newspaper, 
Le Californien. 



Richard Lock, former resident and teacher in Japan, 

now doing graduate work in Berkeley. 
William Mandel, widely recognized authority on the 

USSR and author of RUSSIA RE-EXAMINED. 
Keith Murray, of r the Ecology Center. 
Helga Lohr-Bailey, journalist and writer, who nas just 

returned after a prolonged stay in the Eastern 

European world. 



CLASSIFIED AD copy should be re- 
ceived the first of the month for pub- 
lication in the following month's 
Folio. Ad rate is .40 per word, payable 
in advance (phone number counts as 
one word). Clearly state the number 
of months ad should run. Send to: 
Classified Ads, KPFA, 2207 Shattuck 
Ave., Berkeley, Ca. 94704. 



PROPERTIES 



HI-FI & SOUND 



RECORDING: Non-profit sound re- 
cording by appointment. Westminister 
Audio Service, 14148thSt., Berkeley, 
Ca., LA 4-6842 after 2 PM. (679-0) 

DAVID HAIGHT, audio consultant. 
Guaranteed service, installation, sales, 
audio equipment. Registered electro- 
nic repair dealer. No. 9446. San 
Francisco 285-3974, by appointment. 
(405-0) 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



SERVICES 



INSTRUCTION 



HOME AND INVESTMENTS: KPFA 
spoken here. To buy or sell (a home, 
lot or income property), tune in with 
us. Tepping Realty Co., Berkeley, 
TH 3-5353; El Cerrito, LA 6-5353 
(426-0) 

READY TO SELL? Why not list with 
an active inter-racial office that be- 
lieves in integrated neighborhoods. 
Call and let's talk. Central Realty 
Service. Arlene Slaughter, Realtor. 
OL 8-2177. TH 9-2976 evenings. 
(673-0) 

KPFA Music Director needs help. 
Charles and wife desire 2 bedroom 
house in surrounding area. Can afford 
max. $140/mo. Any leads appreciated. 
Call 848-6767. 

ROOM WANTED Older, quiet female 
grad student (UC Davis) needs over 
night room 1—2 nights/wk for course 
work. References. Rent $25/mo. Call 
collect (916) 756-5977. 



CARPENTER - First class work, 
reasonable. Remodeling, additionsand 
repairs. Kitchens, bathrooms, family 
rooms, garages, carports, decks, patios. 
San Anselmo, 453-1821 (536-0) 

WORKING CONTRACTOR: reason- 
able, reliable. Small repairs or kitchens, 
bathrooms, room additions. Licensed. 
John Hausmann, 841-5573 (2429-0) 

C.J. HUGHESCO. Remodeling special- 
ists. Thoughtful planning, expert work- 
manship, room additions. Kitchens, 
bathrooms, decks. 848-7323 (2451-0) 

STAINED GLASS: Design, repair, in- 
struction and supplies. Leaded windows 
made to order. Mollica Stained Glass, 
1940-A Bonita, 849-1591. 

ELI ROOFING CO. Shingling con- 
tractor specializing in unusual roofs; 
wood shingles and shakes, thatch 
roofs, random shingling. Free estimate. 
849-4395. 

HOUSEPAINTING - inside and out. 
Wallpapering and tile work. 
LA 6-1805. (641-0) 



»»»*#*•** 



LAND INVESTORS RESEARCH: 
Tax problems? Let us show you how 
to invest your tax dollars at a profit, 
and avoid paying them all to Uncle 
Sam. Write for free information, 
484 Magnolia Drive, Larkspur, Calif., 
94939. (637-0) 

PIANO TUNING: Action repair and 
regulating. John Hammett. S.F. 282— 
3170. 



CLASSICAL Guitar and Lute Lessons. 

Robert Strizich. 849-1870. 

J 
GUITAR - PIANO - FLUTE - BANJO 
- DRUMS — Expertly taught. Studios, 
Tupper & Reed, 841-1832. Rentals 
available. 

RADICAL clarinet lessons — Eugene 
Turitz. 841-9350. 

NEW DANCE WORKSHOP classes 
modern dance technique, creative 
dance, bellydancing. 6371 Telegraph 
Ave., Oakland. Information: 549-3678 
or 848-4566. 

LESSONS IN piano or composition 
by published composer — performer 
(student of Stockhausen and Julian 
White). John Dinwiddie, 841-3922. 

ALI AKBAR KHAN. Shankar Ghosh, 
G.S. Sachdev teaching classical Indian 
sarod, sitar, tabla, flute, and vocal. 
Fall session, September 27 to Decem- 
ber 20th, Ali Akbar College of Music, 
P.O. Box 297, Sausalito, Calif. 94965. 
457-2518. 

PIANO: Theory ear training. Beginning, 

advanced — children, adults. Javier, 

841-1310. 

CELLO AND THEORY Instruction: 

Experienced, good with children. Fred 

Silverman. 548-1575. 

CLASSICAL GUITAR Instruction: 
Student of Karl Scheit, Vienna 
Musikakademie. M. Stanis. 848-0444. 



HAND-CRAFTS 



J. KRISHNAMURTI. For information 
on his speaking schedules, writings, 
and recordings, write to Krishnamurti 
Foundation of America, P.O. Box 216, 
Ojai, Calif. 93023. Telephone (805) 
646-2726. 




1 



SANDALS UNLIMITED - Quality 
leather goods custom made. 1951 
Shattuck Ave., Berkeley, 845-6216. 

HANDWOVENS & SANDALS The 
Sandal Shop, 900 North Point St. , 
San Francisco. 

HANDCRAFTS FROM EUROPE, 
Sausalito. 332-1633 

Store No. 1 at Village Fair 
Store No. 2 (Braids & Buttons) 
at 1210 Bridgeway 
Needleworks at Village Fair. 

PICTURE FRAMES. The Artisans, 
Custom Framing, 1964 Union St. 
S.F.WA 1-0456. (2304-0) 

JOTTERS WHEELS. Quality kick- 
wheels, $96.00. Brochure: 2397 San 
Pablo Avenue, Berkeley. 845-7471. 



46 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



ORGANIZATIONS 


MUSIC 


PETS 


FELLOWSHIP OF HUMANITY 
Challenging programs, provocative, 
stimulating. 411 - 28th Street, 
Oakland, Sunday 1 1 AM. All invited. 
(636-0) 

ROSICRUCIANS Write for free book- 
let. The Mastery of Life, Rosicrucian 
Park, San Jose, Ca. 951 14 (0) 


INA CHALIS, soprano, Greta Kranz- 
ler, pianist, in Lieder and piano 
recital, Sunday, October 18th, 3:00 
PM, Music and Arts Institute, 2622 
Jackson St., S.F. Admission: $2.00; 
Students: $1.00. 


HOMES WANTED - dogs, cats - 
Animal Switchboard 885-2679. 


CALLIGRAPHY 


HANDLETTERING: Calligraphy and 
design. Your favorite quote on fine 
parchment. Announcements, bro- 
chures, menus, posters, etc. 
SARAGRAPHICS, 1711 Grove St., 
Berkeley. 549-1330. 


INSTRUMENTS 


FOR SALE: Neupert single manual 
harpsichord. 8', 4'. $1300. 526-3525.' 



THE 

EXHIBITIONIST 

GALLERY 

Non-figurative 
contemporary art 
at medium prices 

2253 UNION STREET 




tKtpS 

cut 
tKavel 



ioo; College r\v*c n U< , 
"Bemcleii .California 0470s; 

5 49-0950 



impoRTED scflnDinnvmn purriture 



We are the smallest Scandinavian furniture store in 
the Bay Area and perhaps the only furniture store in 
the country with two complete lines of bedroom 
furniture on a shelf— and we think the only one which can 
make that dubious claim. 



Because we are small, we have to be more 
selective. Come by and see for yourself. 

We are open 12 noon to6 P.M. and 7:30 to 
to 9P.M. and often later. But never in the 
morning and never on Sunday. 



Finer Contemporary Design 

Superior Craftsmanship 
& Joinery in Quality 
Woods and Fabrics 

i Terms available 




1228 Grant Ave. at Columbus- North Beach 
phone- 781-7841 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



47 



I 



77/£" &4tV FRANCISCO CONSER VA TOR Y OF MUSIC 



NEW MUSIC 
ENSEMBLE 

Howard Hersh, Director 
OPENING CONCERT OF THE 1970/71 SEASON 

Nam-June Paik: Masterpiece Anestis Logothetis: Katarakt 

Earle Brown: Available Forms I Karlheinz Stockhausen: Kurzwellen 

(American Premiere) 
John Cage: Winter Music with Atlas Eclipticalis 

Yuji Takahashi, piano soloist 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1970 
8:30 p.m. 



Admission: $2.00 



Hearst Court, de Young Museum < 

j 

Golden Gate Park, San Francisco < 



53S^555g5g55ggga^ S5^g5^3asa5^^^BS5^a5B5^ SS^ g ^BsBS5^5gg35S 



THE 



AUDIO SHOP 

AUDIO - ELECTRONIC 
SALES and SERVICE 

PERSONAL ATTENTION BY 

AUDIO SPECIALISTS FOR 

VCoR SALES & SERVICE NEEDS 

2985 COLLEGE AVENUE 

BERKELEY, CALIF. 94705 

549-0206 



COUNTRY LAND IN 
MENDOCINO 

5-10-40 Acre Homesteads. 

Terms on 10 acres, $800 down. 

$70 per month, on total of 

$7500. 

Larger, extended family-sized 

sections, less per acre. 

Neighbors of Good Faith. 
California Agrarian League 
707-263-6402 



48 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



WE SUPPORT 
KPFA 

ANDREWS TRAVEL 

2205 SHATTUCK 
BERKELEY 

8483700 
CALLUS ANYTIME 

Member American Society of Travel Agents 







• * 



AS WlHt MexaiAm to tul &**(/M/ry, 
Wt offex. yoy 4 beautiful &K* Kith 

g£UK£P PBOPL& TO /(ELF W /A/ /Mt 
S£l£CT)0M OF- GAUF6UM AMD IMPOKThD 

WMESy As Well AS IMFoxjed B£tx&. 

We- mite, ion to &tvam yout. EMrry 
Bonus -n> us fox. &i/se « & c/cun*. 



m 



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*r pexAtTA i« Hottnt ,tlFK*Fify 

&Z7-Z6QO to AM, — /OffM-Oto* 









KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



49 



s^\ STEREO AND HI-FI COMPONENTS 
DISCOUNT PRICES 

IO% DOWN— 24 MONTHS TO PAY 



$OMm>VR<i vQ&V© 2342 shattuck avi. 

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SERVICE, STOCK & CUSTOM CABINETRY 
KLIPSCH, MclNTOSH, FISHER, ETC. 

BERKELEY CUSTOM 
ELECTRONICS 

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10-6 Saty., and Thurs. Eve. to 9 p.m. 



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Ages 5-15 • A Creat've Alternative • can 526 5952 

525-7708 
526-3381 



j[mt{1?Me& 



THE HOME OF THE "NOW" GENERATION, AND OF 

THE MEMORY OF THE GENERATION IN WHICH THEY 

BREWED-IT-UP 

Come in and see it yourself. Take your shoes 
off and relax in our warm atmosphere, and 
we will give your our best. 

T^RESfAL^AN'IVRATHSkKLI>;R^ ! 



X4.S.0XW) 



H4K-0KH8 
RAVI". Bl.Kkl.U.Y 



50 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 




NOW OPEN SEVEN NIGHTS A WEEK 

DINNER RESTAURANT 
1 974 Shaltuck 

(just N. of Univ. Ave.) 

Greek, French, and Mediterranean things 
TH 9-0706 



Vfti ct Trornaqt 




525-9916 



Eid Brown, Ghef de Gulsinc 



\$$6 Jotatw Jve- Jmamj 




Let us take the 
weight off your 
shoulders with 
quality light- 
weight backpacking 
gear from the 
SKI HUT. 
write for catalog 

the ski hut 

1615 university ave. 

Berkeley,' calif. 

94703 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



51 



Something for 
Everyone . . . 



at Books Unlimited 
Co-op 

1550 Shattuck 
3000 Telegraph 
Berkeley 

841-5795 




Unique imports & 
Domestic wares 
Tapestries 
Jewelry 
Ceramics 




Clothing 



^ li W V/^-£ # ° */ 

gamut 

^^ 776-3420 



1028 Geary St 
San Francisco 



EVERYONE CAN 

SHOP CO-OP 

EVEN KPFA SUBSCRIBERS 



® 



Co-op Centers in 

Berkeley Castro Valley 

El Cerrito 

Walnut Creek Corte Madera 



4 

BAY AREA FUNERAL SOCIETY 


P.O. BOX 264 


BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 


841-6653 


and 


PENINSULA FUNERAL SOCIETY 


168 SO. CALIFORNIA AVE. 


PALO ALTO, 94306 


321-2100 


non-profit cooperatives 


providing families with a choice 


of simple, lowcost 


minimal funerals. 


A direct challenge 


to the high cost of dying 


in America 



@Ja*«* A £/«J| 


IB > ^ 


HARPSICHORD K?; 




and Early Pianoforte ft ..;. 
restoration, repairs 


^iQ^^~~~ 'I i 


1095 VALLEY FORGE DRIVE Bo*4( 

SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 94087 

Phone: 415-968-4132 Agent for new 


and used harpsichords 




52 



KPFA FOLIO/OCTOBER 1970 



C A 


N 


Y O 


N 1 


THURSDAY NIGHT SHOWINGS 


OF 


INDEPENDENT FILMS. 1 


OPEN SCREENING AFTERWARDS 


C 


1 


N 


E M A 


800 CHESTNUT ST., S.F. 
332-1514 




T 


H 


E 


Q U 


E 1 




Imported coffees 
Roasted in our own store 
Special Blended Teas 
Herbs and Spices 
Whole and Ground 
Mail Orders 
Promptly Filled. 
1 block above Shattuck 
2124 Vine Street 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Tel. 841-0564 



BERKELEY MONTESSORI 
limited enrollment available — 
offering unusual combination 
indoor - outdoor 
classrooms 
academic to 

tree-climbing 
children 3 a /2 - 5 years 
phone 843-9374 
apply school office 
2030 Francisco 



.S\N FRANC »SCO 
ART INSTITUTE 
STORE 

PAINT, ETCH fLITHO 

SOpPuESxCERAtA \CS 

TOOLS,£AHVASv 

READY-ftAt£.CANV/£ 

800CJHE^rWOT ST. 

"7~7/-"702.O 

wb're a now PROFIT STORE • 




Dated Program 

ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED ^^ 



KPFA FOLIO 
^207 shattuck 
berkeley, calif. 
94704 



Nonprofit Org. 

U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Berkeley, Calif. 

Permit No. 219